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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Eagle Point Eaglets 1901-

News from Eagle Point, Oregon from the pen of A. C. Howlett. Transcribed by Connie Merriman Bissell. Thanks!


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Thos. Lewis, son of Frank Lewis, spent the holidays with relatives in Woodville.
    Mrs. Argelee Green left for Seattle last Sunday, to join her sister, Mrs. C. H. Jones.
    Miss Etta Wilson was the guest of our daughter Lavia, during our stay at the Sterling mine.
    Some of our young folks met at the Betz school house on Christmas Eve and had a social dance.
    Notices were posted on our school house on Monday of last week stating that there would be no school until next Monday.
    F. L. Howey, formerly of this place, now of Seattle, is visiting Jerry Heckathorn and his mother and Frank Lewis and family.
    Mrs. Heckathorn went to Woodville last Sunday to spend Christmas with her daughters, Mesdames Simpkins, Haymond and Meagley.
    George Brown, one of our leading business men, took a trip to Jacksonville last week, and other parts of the valley, remaining several days.
    Mrs. Paul Van Scoy, nee Lottie Brown, arrived at the home of her parents Sunday from Montague, Calif. She reports a case of smallpox at that place.
    O. P. McGee and family returned last Wednesday from Josephine County, where they have been on a visit to the old folks and for a family reunion. They report a very pleasant time.
    Died--December 25, 1900, on Rogue River, north of Eagle Point, at the residence of Jeff Johnson, James Geary, son of Sam Geary, aged about 15 years. His death was very sudden, caused by congestion of the bowels.
    I am again called upon to chronicle the death of another of our old citizens, William F. Wilkinson, of Derby, which occurred on Dec. 27, 1900. Deceased was born in Lafayette County, Mo., Dec. 15, 1839, and came to this country in 1869. Soon after his arrival here he was married to Susan Hudson, formerly of Jacksonville. They have resided on their farm near Derby most of the time since. He leaves a wife and several relatives as well as numerous friends to mourn his loss.
    Irvin Pool, Harry Cingcade, Earl Taylor, Walter Wood and Merritt Brown were reported on the sick list Monday morning, which will interfere with the arrangement for the ball game in Ashland Tuesday. Since writing the foregoing I have learned that Harry Caton is also on the sick list. It seems a little strange that one of the professors of the normal school should come here with a ball team that had been exposed to the measles and scatter the disease among the ball players and then make arrangements to have them come to Ashland and play for the championship for Southern Oregon. I heard the captain remark that they could not raise but ten or eleven players as there were so many down with the measles. Our business men feel that they have been badly treated in that respect and that the authorities in the normal are censurable for permitting those who were known to have been exposed to visit our town in that way.
    On Monday of last week your Eagle Point correspondent and wife and two youngest daughters, Hattie and Agnes, went to Sterling to spend Christmas with our son-in-law, Jas. Lewis, and family. We arrived at 5 p.m. and found everybody busily preparing a Christmas tree. About 8 o'clock the neighbors began to arrive, and after a short opening address by your correspondent, the presents were distributed by Misses May Allen and Hattie Howlett. The tree was very hastily arranged and decorated and everyone in the room received something to cause them to remember the occasion. After refreshments of candy and nuts and a pleasant hour of social converse, the company dispersed to their respective homes. The next day we visited the Sterling mines. They were only running one pipe and a small force of men, but enough could be seen to show that there is a large amount of enterprise in that locality. That evening there was a social dance and a basket supper at the school house. There were about sixty present and all hands seemed to enjoy themselves. At midnight supper was served--and say, talk about your suppers! We thought we had fine suppers at home--and so we do--but this was simply grand--good enough for a king. Soon after supper some of us old folks went home, but the young people remained until morning. We returned to our home the next day, having had one of the most pleasant times of our lives.
Medford Mail, January 4, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    J. R. Tyrrell left for home Monday, where he will spend the holidays.
    Miss Bessie Conde returned home a few days since at the close of a very successful term of school on Big Butte.
    Miss Cressie Norton closed her school at Lake Creek with an entertainment which was enjoyed by all. She returned home to Ashland last week.
    The entertainment and Christmas tree here was a grand success. During the last song Santa Claus made his appearance, much to the delight of the children and audience. He soon proceed to unburden the well-loaded tree. Old and young were alike remembered. There was a plentiful supply of candy and nuts for everybody. The dance later in the evening was also a very pleasant social event, and all in all there was nothing to mar the pleasure of the evening. Among the visitors were Misses Annie Nichols and Lottie Taylor, Earl Taylor and John Moomaw, of Eagle Point, Miss Sophia Ratrie, J. D. Culbertson and Manly Conley, of Lake Creek, Miss Edith Cox, Carl Geppert, Homer Cox and Charley Obenchain, of Big Butte.
Medford Mail, January 4, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Donnie McGee, who has been visiting his grandparents, in Josephine County, returned home last Saturday.
    Mrs. J. A. Jonas has gone to Ashland to attend to the wants of her son, Robert, who is ill with the measles. He is a student at the normal.
    Mrs. Charles Carney and daughter, Pansy, of Jacksonville, visited T. E. Nichols and family recently. They were accompanied home by Miss Laura Nichols.
    There are a few more cases of measles in this neighborhood. The afflicted ones are getting along quite well with the exception of Earl Taylor, who at this writing is in a very critical condition.
    The snow storm caught quite a number of cattle out in the hills, and the stockmen are now trying to get them through the snow to where they can get feed. In many cases they are scattered in the timber and will probably never be rescued, as the snow fell so suddenly and so deep.
    Mrs. Emma Baker, accompanied by her brother, started last Monday morning on horseback from Mt. Pitt precinct, to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tungate. Although the snow was forty-two inches deep on the road, Mrs. Baker thought they could make the trip--twenty-four miles--in a day.
    Mr. Cox, the mail carrier from Big Butte, failed to make his trip on Wednesday of last week, but came in on Thursday. He reported that the snow was between four and five feet deep at the Big Butte post office. He said to tell the Mail that it is not all summer on his route, but a little winterish at present.
    On Monday, December 31st, our daughter, Hattie, gave a birthday party to some of her schoolmates. There were quite a number present, but some were detained at home on account of the measles. Various games were indulged in, but the crowning feature of the party was the hunting for walnuts for a prize. Stella McGee was the lucky one and received the prize, a nice mug.
    The recent snow storm did considerable damage around here. The telephone wire was broken in several places, and a number of sheds and barns collapsed under the weight of the snow. T. Dugan's shed fell in, killing a cow, smashing his buggy and header and damaging his wagon considerably. A. Betz' barn gave away and killed two of his best cows, while the shed on the old Fryer place also collapsed.
Medford Mail, January 11, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    Carl Vonderhellen, of Wellen, was with friends in town Friday.
    J. R. Tyrrell returned Friday for school, after a two weeks' vacation at home.
    Miss Myrtle Daley and Miss Sophia Ratrie, of Lake Creek, visited with friends in town Wednesday.
    Cattle men are doing lively work since the late severe storms, hunting and driving in stock.
    Arthur Nichols was at Willow Prairie, on Big Butte, and says the snow fell to a depth of 22 inches the first night and before the storm was over had reached a depth of four and five feet in many places on mountains and in canyons.
    The mail carrier starting from Big Butte found himself greatly retarded by the snow, which lay at a depth of 45 to 48 inches, and deeper in those vicinities. The first trip through, three men accompanied him as far as Rocky Gulch, three miles this side of J. A. Obenchain's, where the snow began to grow shallower as the country widened out toward the valley.
Medford Mail, January 11, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Uncle Nick Young is gradually improving, and we hope will soon be able to use his arm.
    Chester Miller, of Ashland, is here visiting his grandfather, A. Pool, and other relatives.
    Miss Donna Bell, of Humboldt County, Calif., accompanied by her son, came up last week to visit her mother, Mrs. Geo. Heckathorn.
    Mrs. J. A. Jonas, who has been at Ashland nursing her son, Robert, returned home last Tuesday. She reports him improving and able to resume his studies at the normal this week
    Frank Pool picked a nice bouquet of flowers out of the snow the other day and sent them to friends in Ohio. He has purchased eighty acres of land of J. S. Howard and is preparing to build on it and make a home among us.
    Dr. G. B. Cole has sold his stock of patent medicines and announces his intention to leave here and settle in Central Point. He says there is too much riding in this locality for a man of his age and health. There is a good opening now here now for a good physician.
    Chas. Wilkinson, who has been up at the ranch of his cousin, the late W. F. Wilkinson, since his death, returned home last Saturday. He reports having had quite a serious time getting Mrs. W.'s cattle together that were scattered on the range, on account of the deep snow.
    C. Moomaw, son of J. P. Moomaw, came near meeting with a serious accident one day last week. As he was going down the steps from the house his feet slipped and he fell with his back on the foot scraper. Fortunately he did not strike his spine, but received a bad cut about ten inches long at the side of the spine. At last accounts he was improving.
    Died--On Monday evening, Jan. 7, 1901, Robert Earl Taylor, son of Mrs. R. G. Brown, aged seventeen years, eleven months and two days, of a complication of diseases--grippe, measles and pneumonia. The remains were interred in the Jacksonville cemetery on Wednesday. The weather was so inclement and the roads so bad that but few of the many friends of the family were able to attend the funeral. The family were all sick with the measles and were obliged to remain at home, except his stepfather, Mr. Brown. Six of his companions went as pallbearers, and quite a number of friends joined the procession at Central Point and Jacksonville, where religious services were held at the grave by Rev. Haberly, of Medford. Earl was a promising young man, full of life and energy, and his loss will be felt by the whole community. The family have the sympathy of the entire neighborhood in their sad bereavement.
Medford Mail, January 18, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    Miss Sophia Ratrie, of Lake Creek, entered school here last Tuesday.
    Miss Donna Bell left for Ashland a few days go, where she has entered the normal.
    Jacob Walsh returned from California this week, and is spending a few days in town.
    Mrs. E. V. Osborne, who has been in very poor health for several months, is greatly improved during the past few weeks.
    The school house on Big Butte went down a few days ago with the weight of snow heaped upon it during the continued storm.
    Miss Edna Charley spent last week with Mrs. R. G. Brown and family, of Eagle Point, for company and help during their severe illness. She returned home Sunday.
    Oliver McGee, of Eagle Point, and J. H. Tyrrell, of South Butte, spent Monday evening very pleasantly with J. K. Bell and family. They were riding for cattle in this vicinity.
    The people of our community deeply sympathize with the bereaved relatives of the late Earl Taylor, whose death was announced in last week's Mail. Truly Earl will be missed by his many friends.
Medford Mail, January 25, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    We had no mail on Tuesday of last week, owing to obstructions on the railroad.
    Mr. Thos. McAndrew, Jr., who is stopping at the Eagle Hotel, is reported on the sick list.
    The school board had a meeting on Monday of this week, but I was unable to get the proceedings.
    Chas. Obenchain brought the mail out from Big Butte last week, owing to the sickness of the carrier, Mr. Cox.
    Miss Eva Cook, who has been stopping at the Eagle Hotel for some time, went to the Big Butte country last week.
    Our stockmen have been quite successful in gathering their stock from the range, having found nearly all of them.
    The high water in Little Butte caused the debris to collect so in the mill race that it was necessary to close down the mill one day last week
    Mrs. S. F. Robinson, who is advanced in age and quite heavy, fell one day last week and struck the back of her neck on a chair, almost breaking it.
    Mrs. J. W. Grover gave a wool-picking party last Wednesday. The party was composed entirely of elderly ladies, and they report a very enjoyable time as well as a very fine dinner.
    Miss Laura Nichols came out from Medford last Thursday, where she has been staying with her cousin, Mrs. Joan Curry, who is very sick at the home of her mother, Mrs. Jane Plymale.
    Cattle buyers are thick in this section of the country. Mr. Hunt, of Ashland, and Mr. Harris, of Gazelle, were here last week. The former went up Little Butte and the latter to Trail Creek.
    Irwin Pool, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Pool, who has been quite sick with the measles, has taken a relapse, I am sorry to state, and is now in a very critical condition. Dr. Cole is in attendance.
    I am requested by Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown to tender, through the Medford Mail, their sincere thanks to their friends for their assistance and sympathy at the time of their recent sad bereavement.
    Messrs. Ringer and Frank Pool are doing some fine cabinet work here, and we are glad to have such men settle here. Mr. Ringer is talking of sending for his family with a view to locating here in this section.
    Mrs. David Ball and son, of Humboldt County, Calif., who has been visiting her mother, Mrs. Geo. Heckathorn, was unexpectedly called home last week. Her brother, Jerry Heckathorn, accompanied her. [See correction in next week's column.]
Medford Mail, January 25, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Ed Hanley, of Woodville, is visiting Jerry Heckathorn.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Simon, of Tolo, is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Geo. W. Daley, Sr.
    Ira Tungate came out from Mt. Pitt precinct last Sunday. He reported that the snow was still a little over a foot deep in that section.
    Wm. Ulrich and O. P. McGee brought their cattle out from the Rancherie country last week, taking them to the valley to feed. They were looking fine.
    Last week I stated that Jerry Heckathorn and his sister, Mrs. David Ball, had gone to Humboldt County, California, but I should have said Woodville, Oregon.
    We had another light snowstorm last Thursday, but the snow did not stay on long. The snow is of great benefit to the grain and fruit trees, protecting the former from the heavy frosts and keeping the trees from coming out too soon. We expect to have an abundant crop of fruit again this year.
    We are still having a seize with the measles in this community, in some families as many as seven being down at one time. Some of the cases are proving very serious, James Barker being reported quite low with them. There have been about one hundred cases in this section, and the end is not yet in sight.
    The first of last week Mrs. Eli Dahack, while leading a colt on which her little boy was riding, by some means had her leg broken. She does not know how it happened, whether the colt reared and struck her with its forefeet or kicked her on the leg. Dr. Cole was called from Central Point and reduced the fracture.
    It has been rumored that Eagle Point was to be left without a telephone since the Sunset Company had bought the local lines in the valley. I am glad to be able to state, however, that rumor was wrong, for the company, instead of taking down our line, will put up better wire and also make other needed improvements.
    The school board met on Monday of last week and decided to levy a seven-mill tax to pay off the remaining debt on the school house. They also decided to have no school until the spring term, and then to have but one teacher, as there are not children enough in attendance to justify hiring two teachers, besides there will not be money enough without levying a tax for that purpose and that is not thought advisable.
    The business enterprises of our town are on the increase. A. J. Daley & Son are putting in a stock of merchandise and expect more goods to arrive from the East in a short time. There is also considerable talk of utilizing the water power that is going to waste here, and people are beginning to see that the Butte Creek country is coming to the front. I recently heard one of our leading business men remark that there was more produce, including stock, sent out from the Butte Creek country than from any other part of the county in proportion to the population.
Medford Mail, February 1, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mrs. George Garrett was visiting her mother, Mrs. Clara Rader, last week.
    Frank Pool is building a house on the tract of land he purchased from J. S. Howard, and expects to move into it as soon as it is completed.
    Mr. Ringer is expecting his family here soon from Ohio. He has rented the Thomas Coy house and will commence housekeeping as soon as they arrive.
    Last Sunday we had the pleasure of the company of Mrs. Elizabeth Simon, Mrs. Geo. Daley and daughter, Maggie, and Mrs. Ringer. O. P. McGee and family also came in and spent the evening. We had some fine vocal and instrumental music, Miss Stella McGee presiding at the organ.
    Died--January 29, 1901, Dolly Avarilla Beck, daughter of Aaron and Lena Beck, with measles, aged four years, nine months and four days. The neighbors very kindly administered to the wants of the grief-stricken family, nearly all of them being confined to the house with the same disease.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Chambers and son, William, were the guests of Mrs. E. Sinclare Wednesday night of last week. Mr. Chambers, who had his leg broken some two months ago, has been stopping in Medford with his son-in-law, Mr. Bateman, and at Col. Maury's, near Central Point, for some time, and was on his way to his home at Big Butte. Henry Maury accompanied him to Eagle Point, where he was met by his son, Mr. Maury returning home the same day, accompanied by Miss Myrtle Chambers. Mr. Chambers has so far recovered from his accident as to be able to walk with crutches.
    While out hunting a short time ago Melvin and Elvin Hayes, living on the old Dunlap place in Mt. Pitt precinct, saw a coyote, and while trying to get a shot at it Melvin broke through the snow, causing his gun to go off, the ball striking Elvin in the leg just above the knee and inflicting an ugly flesh wound, but fortunately breaking no bones. After taking his brother home  Melvin started for the George Jackson place, on Rogue River, for his brother, Charles. While crossing the river in a small boat he lost one of the oars, and losing control of the boat it drifted down the river. After he had passed the Jackson ford, where the water is shallow, and had reached deep water he jumped out of the boat and tried to swim out, but the water was so cold he was unable to reach the shore and he was drowned in the deep water. At last accounts the body had not been recovered. His widowed mother is almost beside herself with grief, having but recently lost her husband.
Medford Mail, February 8, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    Chester Miller, of Ashland, is visiting with relatives on Big Butte.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Geer are the happy parents of a fine boy, born Sunday, Jan. 27, 1901.
    John Aller, an aged gentleman from Fostoria, Iowa, is spending the winter in town, for his health.
    E. M. Cox, our mail carrier, was taken suddenly ill and had to lay off for a few days, but is again on the road.
    Mrs. Elva Miller, of South Butte, came down with her father, T. Baldwin, for two days' visit in town last week.
    Mrs. Nussbaum, of Lake Creek, received a call Monday, to attend the funeral of her son-in-law, Owen Short, who lived in Phoenix.
    Elvin Hays, of Big Butte, received a severe flesh wound by an accidental shot through his leg, above the knee, a short time since.
    Mrs. J. W. Slinger and little girl, of McCallister Springs vicinity, are just recovering from the measles. Several other cases are reported to the same neighborhood.
Medford Mail, February 8, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Your Eagle Point correspondent made a business trip to the county seat Saturday.
    Miss Etta Wilson, who has been teaching the primary department of our school, went to Central Point last week to remain.
    Mrs. Geo. Heckathorn, who has been quite ill for some time, is improving, we are glad to say. One of her daughters, Mrs. W. B. Haymond, of Woodville, is with her.
    Mrs. J. F. Brown gave a rag tacking party last Wednesday night to quite a number of her friends. Everybody had a fine time, and about twenty pounds of rags were sewed.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Simon, who has been stopping with the family of Jas. Owens for several days, returned to the house of her daughter, Mrs. Geo. Daley, last Monday morning.
    Mrs. J. W. Grover and Mrs. Knighten made a business trip to Medford last Saturday and owing to the very rough roads had to stop in Central Point to have their hack repaired.
    Owens brothers were away last Monday after fence posts that they had bought of Geo. Brown & Sons. On the same day, Brown & Sons sold to Central Point parties their entire stock of posts, consisting of several hundred.
    Albert Beale, of Mt. Pitt precinct, came out last week for supplies. He reports feed scarce in his section of the country and the snow fifteen inches deep and frozen hard and very cold weather. He says the stock will have to be driven out unless there is a change in the weather soon.
    There was a stranger here a short time ago looking for a location to open up a hotel or buy the Eagle Hotel. It is rumored that he is interested in the timber business and is thinking of making this a half-way station for their business. He did not succeed, however, in procuring a situation, as our citizens are not anxious to sell at present, as the prospects for an advance in real estate is good.
Medford Mail, February 15, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Thomas Anderson was here last week interviewing our business men.
    Benj. Edmondson and John Allen, of Derby, were here last week after supplies.
    Al. Mayfield, of Klamathon, came over last week for a visit with his brother-in-law, Mr. Knighten.
    Robt. Jonas, who is attending the normal school at Ashland, came home last week for short visit.
    Mesdames J. E. Geary and John Smith and Miss Lewis were the guests of Mrs. Dahack one day last week.
    A. J. Daley made a business trip to Central Point, Jacksonville and Medford last week, returning home Friday.
    Frank Pool went to Medford last week to get the doors and windows for his new house. He moved into it last Monday.
    I understand that Mr. McCullough has sold his property, just above town, to a Mr. Jacks, who has moved his family thereto.
    Miss Tavia Howlett is visiting with Miss Anna Pankey, of Central Point. She expects to spend a few days with Mrs. Harry Carlton before returning home.
    Mrs. E. Simon, who has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. Daley, for some time, has returned to her home near Tolo. She is making her home with her son, Edward.
    Rev. J. P. Moomaw will preach at the Eagle Point Dunkard Church next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m. Everybody is invited to attend, as he has something of importance to say to the public. 
    The water was so high in Butte Creek last Saturday that our grist mill could not run, and the result was that the owners were obliged to run last Sunday to be able to fill an order for mill stuff.
    Walter Robinett, who has been over at Henley, Calif., for some time, returned to the parental roof last week. He reports that there is so much snow in that vicinity that there is nothing to do.
    Dr. Cole came out from Central Point last week to reset Mrs. Eli Dahack's leg, the bones having failed to kit. She has been having a serious time with her limb, but at last accounts was resting easy.
    W. W. French, while cutting wood a few days ago, had the misfortune to sever the fourth toe on [his] right foot. How he did it without cutting any other part of his foot is a mystery. At last accounts the injured member was doing well.
    Messrs. Harris and Stone, of Gazelle, Calif., were here last week interviewing our cattlemen. They went from here to Trail to look at Mr. Johnson's cattle. I understand they are offering fancy prices for cattle, but have not heard of anyone selling yet.
Medford Mail, February 22, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
By A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mr. Jacks was trading in town one day last week.
    Capt. West, of Brownsboro, was in town the first of last week on business.
    J. J. Fryer and Mrs. Sinclare were guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Jonas last Sunday.
    Mesdames Thomas, Knighten, Mayfield and Grover were the guests of Mrs. Howlett Sunday.
    Ira Tungate left last Saturday for a lumber camp on the McCloud River in California, to seek employment.
    A. J. Daley, the magnetic healer, was called to see Mrs. Scott Pool, who was suffering with neuralgia last Sunday.
    The warm rain is making the grass grow very fast and in a short time stock men will be driving their stock in the ranges again.
    Lee Black and sister, Matilda, passed through town recently on their way home from Ashland, where they had been upon business.
    Jack Montgomery, Mr. Owens, David Hardy, Mr. Howard and Jas. Kent, of Wellen, were in our town Monday doing business with our merchants.
    F. M. Stewart, the real estate man of Medford, and another gentleman were out the first of the week looking at some of the fine farms in this section.
    Jasper Tungate was in from Mt. Pitt precinct last Sunday and reports the snow from six to eight feet deep up there yet but going away very fast.
    The report reached here last Sunday that Mr. Pankey, of Sams Valley, had found the body of Mr. Hays, who was drowned in Rogue River a few weeks ago.
    Mesdames Grover, Knighten, Mayfield and Frary were the guests of Mrs. A. M. Thomas one day last week. They had an elegant dinner and a royal good time.
    A. Pool has purchased a small tract of land of Wm. Ulrich, joining his hotel, where he expects to build an addition to the hotel this season, for the accommodation of his patrons.
    In conversation with a lady who has long been a subscriber to the Mail, I asked if she was still receiving the paper. Her reply was that she considered the Mail one of her household necessities, and as long as she was able to pay for it she never would be without it.
    Died--On February 23, 1901, Charles West, son of Capt. and Mrs. West, aged thirty-five years. Deceased, who was a sufferer from consumption, came here for his health but the climate failed to benefit him. Funeral services were conducted Monday by Rev. J. P. Moomaw.
    A few days ago while two of the Smith boys living on Clark's Creek, on the north side of Big Butte, were at work in the timber they ran across a big bear. As they had no ammunition with them their only weapons of defense were clubs and stones, with which the succeeded in killing him. He weighed about two hundred pounds.
Medford Mail, March 1, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Gus Nichols, of Lake Creek, has been quite ill but is improving.   
    Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Howard were visiting with friends in town Tuesday.
    A. T. Bell has been visiting his brother, J. K. Bell, and family the past few days.
    Mike Hanley and family returned home last week after an absence of several weeks on a business trip.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Tucker are the happy parents of a little daughter, born Monday, February 4, 1901.
    Mrs. R. E. Tucker and Mrs. J. K. Bell made a trip to Medford a few days ago, the first from this vicinity since the stormy weather.
    Arden Tyrrell, of South Butte, came down Friday for a visit with his brother, John, who is attending school here. He returned home Saturday.
    Mrs. W. C. Daley, who has been spending a couple of months with her daughter, Mrs. Ora Jones, at Little Shasta Calif., returned home a short time ago.
    Charles C. West, who came here last fall with his parents and brothers from Kelso, Wash, for the benefit of his health, died Saturday, February 23, 1901, after a lingering, painful illness. Though the young man and his family were comparatively strangers, yet all had endeared themselves to the community, and a large concourse of friends mingled with the grief-stricken relatives and followed the remains to the cemetery. The funeral was held Monday, Rev. J. P. Moomaw, of Eagle Point, conducting the services.
Medford Mail, March 1, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    A. J. Daley made a business trip in Medford and Ashland last week, returning home Sunday.
    Miss Ollie Tungate, of Mt. Pitt precinct, came out last week to visit her sister, Mrs. Emanuel Pool.
    Mrs. Frary came out from Central Point last week to visit her sisters, Mesdames Sinclare and Thomas.
    The last case of measles in this vicinity has been disposed of, so that our school will probably reopen with a good attendance.
    Fred Mitchell, of Asbestos, was visiting friends here last week. He returned to his mountain home Monday morning, accompanied by Walter Robinett.
    Frank Pool, who came here from Ohio last fall, and bought a tract of land from J. S. Howard, is now fencing the land and will put in a crop of corn this spring.
    John Moomaw started on Tuesday of last week for Coquille City, where his brother, Benjamin, and family reside. He expects to remain there during the summer.
    While Mr. Ringer was chopping down a tree on Thomas Coy's place, he discovered a kind of gas emitting from a small hollow in the stump, which burned readily when ignited with a match.
    Joe Van Hardenburg, of Central Point, was a pleasant caller here last Sunday. He says they expect to put in forty acres of corn on their place, on the east side of Bear Creek, this season.
    The people on this section of the county feel that we are greatly in need of a good physician in Eagle Point, our nearest medical aid at present being at Central Point, a distance of ten miles.
    Ira Tungate, who went to California a short time ago to work in a sawmill, has returned home.  He reported that the snow was four feet deep at the mill and that work would not commence before the first of April.
    The question has been asked whether or not the severe frosts have damaged the growing wheat. So far as can be learned, the prospects for a crop are good, as it does not appear to be damaged to any great extent.
    There is considerable excitement held over the proposed ditch from Fish Lake to the valley, fears being entertained that the company will take so much water out of the streams that there will not be enough left for irrigating purposes and to run our grist mill.
    A good deal of electioneering was done last week by interested parties for their favorites for school directors, there being the party which favored finishing the school house, while the other was in favor of leaving it unfinished. The election was held on Monday of this week. O. P. McGee was elected director and J. A. Jonas was re-elected clerk. There are eighty-two children of school age in the district.
Medford Mail, March 8, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    L. C. Charley, accompanied by his daughter Edna, made a trip to Medford Tuesday.
    A. T. Bell returned to Medford Thursday after a pleasant visit with relatives here.
    Wm. McCray, accompanied by F. M. Stewart, of Medford, made a business tour through this part of the country the first part of last week.
    Our graduating class, having completed their examination in February, are now busily engaged in preparing for commencement exercises. The entertainment will be given Friday, March 15, 1901, at 7:30 p.m. All from the neighboring communities are cordially invited, and we hope many will meet with us.
    Friends mingled with the mourning relatives and followed the remains of Mrs. Minnie Compton, who died in Spokane, Wash., February 25, 1901, to their last resting place Saturday morning. Deceased was twenty-nine years of age, was a native of Jackson County and died of heart disease. The funeral services were held at the grave. She was laid beside her mother, Mrs. James Miller, in the family cemetery on the old home place.
Medford Mail, March 8, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mrs. Geo. Daley is visiting relatives and friends in the vicinity of Gold Hill.
    Emanuel Pool, one of our blacksmiths, has gone to Jacksonville and will probably locate there.
    Mr. Martin, of Kansas, arrived here last Saturday and is looking for a home in this locality.
    Chauncey Florey, who has been stopping with his grandparents this winter, returned home last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Mayfield, who have been visiting in the section, returned to their home in Talent last week.
    The report that the body of young Hays, who was drowned in Rogue River some time ago, was found near Table Rock, is untrue.
    A Mr. Clark, recently from Missouri, came out from Medford last week looking over the country with a view to renting a place.
    Our school will begin next Monday, but I am unable to state who will teach as the board seems to be divided on that question.
    The directors of the school district, No. 47, (Betz district) want a teacher for the summer term. Address J. E. Hart, Eagle Point, Ore.
    Miss Mary Dawson passed through here last week on her way to school district No. 37, where she will teach the spring term. This is her second term in that district.
    Dr. R. L. Parker, who has been visiting his son-in-law, E. E. Smith and family, in Central Point, spent Saturday and Sunday with O. P. McGee on his way to his mountain home.
    A man passed through here last week looking for a sawmill to purchase, but do not think he was successful. He went to Round Top to look at A. J. Daley's mill but did not buy it.
    After the school election last week, a petition was circulated requesting the board to call a special meeting for the purpose of voting on the question of bonding the district for the sum of $500 to pay for finishing the school house and fencing the grounds.
    W. R. Potter has purchased the house and lot belonging to George Brown between the Eagle Hotel and S. B. Holmes' residence, consideration $75. We are informed that Mrs. Potter will open up a racket store and millinery shop in the building.
    Mr. Gibbons has driven posts along the county road from Eagle Point to Central Point, between J. Montgomery's place and the Pomeroy farm, this shutting off the travel on the route by the oak trees. This route has been traveled for years, and there now seems but one of two things to do, either for the people on this side to remain at home during the winter or for the county to have the road finished so that it can be traveled in winter as well as summer.
Medford Mail, March 15, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mrs. A. Pool visited her mother, Mrs. Evans, last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Carlton were visiting Mrs. C.'s parents Saturday and Sunday.
    Wm. Daley, of Lake Creek, was visiting his son, George, in Eagle Point last Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown visited with J. C. Pendleton and family, at Table Rock, last Sunday.
    Thomas Cingcade, who has been ill at Central Point for some time, was brought home last Saturday.
    There will be preaching services at the Dunkard Church, at this place, next Sunday morning at 11 o'clock.
    The warm weather has dried the ground so that the farmers in this section can finish plowing for their spring crops.
    Frank Tungate and family, of Mt. Pitt precinct, came out last Friday for a few days' visit with Mrs. E. Pool.
    Our school opened last Monday morning with Prof. J. A. Bish as teacher. There are twenty-nine pupils enrolled.
    A. J. Daley and W. R. Potter went up to their Elk Creek mines last Monday. They were accompanied by Mr. Reed, of Medford.
    Our cattlemen have been busy during the past week marking, branding and dehorning their cattle and getting them out onto the range.
    Mr. Jones, of Montague, Calif., accompanied by his wife, passed through town last Monday with a band of cattle which he purchased in this section.
    O. P. McGee and family were unexpectedly called to Josephine County last week by the sudden death of Mr. McGee's father, which occurred on the 12th.
    Mesdames R. G. Brown and S. B. Holmes made a trip to Jacksonville, Medford and Central Point last week, combining business with pleasure. They returned home Saturday.
    Word was received here last week that Mrs. W. J. Compton, formerly of this place, died March 7th, at Whittier, Calif., where she went several months ago for the benefit of her health. She leaves a husband and four children.
    There seems to be more interest taken in our section of the county by homeseekers this spring than there has been heretofore. Almost every day there is someone here inquiring for homes, some wanting to rent and others to purchase land.
    Quite a number of our citizens went to Brownsboro last Friday evening to attend the graduating exercises of the eighth grade of the school at that place. After the program was concluded some of the young folks remained and enjoyed a social dance.
    The contractors who are digging the Britt ditch, extending from below town to the Britt farm on Rogue River, have their work nearly completed. This ditch will enable Mr. Britt to utilize a large tract of pumice land which is now useless, and also to irrigate a large part of his tillable land.
    Last Sunday quite a number of friends came in to help me celebrate my sixty-ninth birthday, they having been invited by Mrs. Howlett without my knowledge. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Severance, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Moomaw and daughter, Virginia, Mr. and Mrs. S. F. Robinett, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Lewis, Mesdames E. Sinclare and A. M. Thomas, and J. J. Fryer and grandson, Austin Green. After dinner Mrs. Harry Carlton and Miss Lottie Taylor came in and enlivened the occasion with some fine music. Altogether it made me feet quite young, and I hope that we may have many more such pleasant reunions.
Medford Mail, March 22, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Farmers are completing their spring sowing this week.
    Chas. Prall, of Central Point, spent a few days with relatives on Big Butte recently.
    Supt. Daily came out to attend the school entertainment Friday evening and was the guest of J. K. Bell.
    John Jones, of Montague, purchased about fifty head of cattle of stockmen in this vicinity this week and drove them out.
    The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Stevens has been quite ill with la grippe and pneumonia, but is improving now.
    The entertainment Friday evening was a grand success. The program was well rendered and won much applause. The diplomas were presented to the class. Misses Nora Charley, Mabel Bell, Sophia Ratrie and John R. Tyrrell, by Supt. P. H. Daily. The class motto was, "Our boat has left the strand; we're rowing, not drifting." The teacher, Miss Carrie Sackett, addressed the class and tendered thanks to the audience. The class song, "We are Sailing," was enthusiastically sung. Mrs. A. C. Howlett, Misses Mattie and Lottie Taylor, of Eagle Point, and Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Carlton, of Wellen, were among the many visitors in attendance.
    Samuel Randles, whose death which occurred at his home on Butte Creek, was noted in your paper last week, was born in Scioto County, [Ohio,] Dec. 13, 1832. When three years of age his parents moved to Illinois and later to Missouri. In the fall of 1851 he crossed the plains to California, where he was married April 21, 1868, to Lydia M. Henry. He next moved to Polk County this state, and a few years later to Butte Creek, where he has resided ever since. His funeral, which took place in Brownsboro, March 15th, was largely attended by friends and relatives. He leaves a wife, Mrs. Lydia Randles, and several grown children, viz.: Mrs. O. A. Tyrrell, of Hornbrook, Calif., Mrs. R. L. Parker, of Coles, Calif., Mrs. J. F. True, of Medford, Mrs. W. S. Gray, P. L. Randles, Ellis and Celia Randles, the two latter of whom reside at home.
A loved one from our home has been taken.
      Dearest father, thy life has fled.
Without thee we are downcast and sad,
      And many are the tears we've shed.
   

In remembrance of thy fond protection,
      We shall miss thy loving care.
Yet not forsaken, amid our dejection;
      For many with us the same lot share.
   

We no more shall hear the tread of thy feet.
      For thy body in the damp grave lies.
Thee again we hope to meet,
      In our home beyond the skies.
Medford Mail, March 22, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Jas. Ringer has gone to Ashland to do some painting.
    Mrs. R. E. Brown was the guest of Rev. Moomaw last Sunday.
    Mrs. Nettie Grover was the guest of Mrs. W. F. Lewis last Sunday.
    Lin Clemens was the guest of Jos. Rader last Saturday night and Sunday.
    Emanuel Pool has been rearranging his fence and otherwise beautifying his home.
    Miss Millsap has been engaged to teach in the Antelope district, which will commence next Monday.
    Mr. Knighten and family, who have been living here during the winter, have moved to Siskiyou County, Calif.
    Geo. Brown & Sons have been binding a large quantity of shakes during the last week and getting them ready for shipment to Yreka.
    Our school is steadily increasing in interest and number, and by the time the measles scare is over we will probably have a full school again.
    Mr. Weston, of Medford, was out here last week trying to organize a Modern Woodmen of America lodge but do not think he met with much success.
    Mrs. Miller and two daughters, of Ashland, came up the first of last week and went to Leeds to visit Mrs. M.'s sister, Mrs. Phipps. They returned home last Saturday.
    A. J. Daley has received a new stock of goods and his business is booming. He's also having marked success as a magnetic healer. See his ad in this week's issue of the Mail.
    There are petitions in the form of a protest being circulated in this section protesting against the Fish Lake Ditch Company taking the water out of Butte Creek, as the farmers along the creek have to depend on the waters of that stream to irrigate their gardens and alfalfa. There will be an injunction filed and the matter be tested in the courts.
    The petition to call a special school meeting of the voters of this district to vote on the proposition to bond the district for $500 has been filed with the clerk, but we are informed that no action will be taken on it as the law provides that there can be but one tax levied each year, and the board has already levied a seven-mill tax to pay up the remainder of the indebtedness of the district.
    Eagle Point is coming to the front. We have two new stores already this spring. Mesdames Holmes and Brown have opened up a millinery store here and Mrs. Rose Potter a racket store, and I understand that John Williscroft will open up a drug store. The indications are that we will need a blacksmith soon, as it is rumored that the two we have expect to leave here soon, one for the benefit of his wife's health, and other has a contract to work for a corporation.
Medford Mail, March 29, 1901, page 5



Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    Geo. West made a business trip to Medford Monday.
    Miss Rosa Messal, of Salt Creek, was trading in town Monday.
    J. D. Culbertson, of Lake Creek, made a trip to Medford the first part of the week.
    L. C. Charley has been hauling out some heavy machinery for the Fish Lake Ditch Company lately.
    Rev. C. L. Corwin, of Medford, preached for us Sunday, March 31st, to a goodly number assembled.
Medford Mail, April 5, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Miss Tavia Howlett was visiting Miss Clara Rader a few days last week.
    Mr. Dailong, a traveling photographer, pitched his tent here last Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Brown were visiting their daughters, Mesdames Holmes and Carlton, during the past week.
    Mesdames E. Pool, Scott Pool and W. F. Lewis were guests of Mrs. G. W. Daley, Jr., last Sunday evening.
    Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Terrilll and Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Severance were the guests of J. M. Nichols and family last Sunday.
    Our school is progressing nicely under the management of Prof. J. A. Bish. There are about fifty pupils enrolled at present.
    Miss Greninger passed through town Saturday on her way to the Betz school district, where she commenced teaching Monday.
    James Ringer did not go to Ashland, as stated last week, but has been engaged in painting in Eagle Point for several days past.
    Mrs. Arnold, who has been visiting the family of her brother, Mr. Henderson, returned to her home in California last Saturday.
    A. J. Daley has increased his stock of goods, and expects in the near future to erect a new store building to make room for his business.
    W. F. Lewis and family have moved to the Willamette Valley, where Mrs. Lewis' father resides. Mr. Lewis expects to work in the hop yards this summer.
    Benj. Fredenburg came down from Big Butte last Monday with a load of shakes for Geo. Brown & Sons. He reports the roads in that section in a very bad condition.
    The machinery for the Fish Lake Irrigation Company is being hauled through here on the way to the head of the proposed canal, where they expect to commence work at once.
    Mrs. Rose Potter has moved her stock of merchandise from her residence to the building recently purchased from Geo. Brown, where she expects to keep an assortment to suit the demands of the people.
    Geo. Brown & Sons shipped a large quantity of shakes to Yreka this week. They do a quite extensive business in the way of handling posts and shakes, and still cannot procure enough in the fall to supply the demand during the winter and spring.
    I recently received a letter from W. H. Mays, of Pearces Mills, Alabama, a brother of K. Mays, who was out here a few years ago, requesting me to send him a copy of the Mail and stating that his brother wants to come back to this country. He says that it rained there almost all of the time for forty days, so that they could not put in their crops, and they want to come to a country where a crop is assured.
Medford Mail, April 5, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mrs. Howlett has opened a boarding house in Eagle Point.
    T. E. Nichols and family were the guests of David Cingcade last Sunday
    Frank Lewis has about completed his contract on the Britt ditch below town.
    The Eagle Point Bachelor Club had an oyster supper at its club room last Sunday night.
    Mrs. R. Potter sees the advantage of advertising in the Mail and has an ad in this week's issue.
    Miss Mae Millsap commenced her school in Antelope district on April 1st with twenty-one names enrolled.
    Mr. and Mrs. Al Stricklin came over from California last Saturday to visit Mr. S.'s mother, Mrs. H. T. Severance.
    Wm. Perry, of Big Butte, while en route to Medford, was compelled to stop here over Sunday as one of his horses was taken ill.
    Rev. J. P. Moomaw went to Ashland last Friday to attend the council of the Dunkard Church. He will preach here next Sunday at 11 a.m.
    Messrs. McCray and Vincent, of the Fish Lake Irrigation Company, were here last week looking up the amount of water used by the different claimants of water rights along Little Butte Creek.
    Last Saturday night Mrs. E. Pool and Misses Ollie Tungate and Mae Millsap were the guests of Mrs. Howlett. Miss Millsap favored us with some excellent vocal and instrumental music.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. Beall, of Mt. Pitt precinct, were the guests of Emanuel Pool last week. Quite a number of friends called on them one evening and while there Mrs. B. favored us with some very fine music, she being an expert on the guitar and violin.
    Married--April 7, 1901, at the residence of the groom's mother, Mrs. A. M. Thomas, Mr. Chas. W. Thomas and Miss Lela Sota Walsh, Rev. J. P. Moomaw officiating. The groom is one of our sturdy and industrious young men, while the bride is a daughter of one of the leading farmers of Wellen. Both of these young people have a number of warm friends here who wish them a long and prosperous journey through life.
Medford Mail, April 12, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mrs. Pettigrew is reported quite ill at the residence of A. Betz.
    Mrs. R. Potter has ornamented her new store with a neat sign.
    Miss Ollie Tungate spent Saturday night with Miss Mae Millsap.
    Ed. Tryer, of Medford, was the guest of O. P. McGee one night last week.
    Miss Mattie Taylor went to Medford last Friday to visit Mrs. E. A. Hicks.
    S. A. Carlton and family were visiting at George Brown's last Sunday.
    Jesse Stearns and family were the guests of J. J. Fryer last Saturday night.
    Mrs. Scott Pool was visiting her sister, Mrs. Thomas Coy, several days last week.
    S. H. Murray and family came out from Medford last Saturday to visit O. P. McGee and family, returning home Sunday afternoon.
    Quite a number of our young folks went to Central Point last Saturday night to attend the entertainment given by Gold Hill talent.
    A game of baseball was played here last Sunday between the Eagle Point and Central Point teams, resulting in a score of 35 to 16, in favor of Eagle Point.
    M. F. Hanley and C. Cassidy, a stockman from Siskiyou County, California, passed through here last Saturday on their way to the Hanley ranch, on Butte Creek, returning to the valley Sunday.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Simon, one of the pioneers of the county, came up from her home, near Tolo, last week for a visit with her daughter, Mrs. G. W. Daley, Sr. She also visited Mr. and Mrs. Calhoun, living over south of the desert.
    Perry McGee came up from Josephine County a short time ago to visit his brother, Oliver, and family. He was accompanied on his return home by Roy and Verna McGee, who will stay with their grandmother for some time. 
    Miss Alta Wood came up last Saturday from her home near the mouth of Little Butte Creek, and was the guest of our daughters until Sunday afternoon. She reports their school progressing finely under the management of Miss Mary Dawson.
    Merritt Brown and his sister-in-law, Mrs. J. F. Brown, left last Saturday for Montague, Calif., to visit Mr. B.'s sister, Mrs. Paul Van Scoy. Mrs. Brown will probably visit relatives at Scott's Bar, and Mr. Brown will go to Grass Valley to visit his sister, Mrs. W. B. Officer, before returning home.
    Last Friday evening the little girls of the community gave their schoolmates, Stella and Mabel McGee, a surprise party. Each one took a cupful of sugar and Mrs. McGee made them a large dish of candy. They had such a good time that they almost forgot to disperse, not returning home until after midnight.
    Last Sunday afternoon several of the neighbors met at our house by appointment for the purpose of singing and having a pleasant time generally. Mrs. Holmes and Mrs. R. G. Brown presided at the organ. Next Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock we are to meet at O. P. McGee's. Everybody is invited to come and help have a good time.
    Nick Young, Jr., had the misfortune to lose one of his fine work horses last week. While crossing the desert he got out of the wagon to walk; the horses became frightened and he attempted to climb into the wagon, but the end gate gave away and before he could regain his position they had gotten under such headway that he could not overtake them. As a result the wagon pole broke and run into the horse's foot, tearing the hoof loose and necessitating the killing of the animal. The loss is quite a heavy one to the young man.
Medford Mail, April 19, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    R. H. Bradshaw of Lake Creek, was in town Saturday.
    Miss Sophia Ratrie, of Lake Creek is attending school at Brownsboro.
    Miss Carrie Sackett reopened school here Monday with a goodly number of pupils present.
    Thomas Hart, who spent the winter on the Hanley ranch in the valley, is visiting relatives in this vicinity.
    Miss Donna Bell returned home from the normal at Ashland last week in order to take charge of her school near Woodville. She began teaching on Monday, April 12th.
    Wm. Chambers, of Big Butte, returned home Tuesday, accompanied by his sister, Mrs. Eva Bateman, of Medford, who will spend some time visiting with relatives in that vicinity.
Medford Mail, April 19, 1901, page 3



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Born--April 20, 1901, to Mr. and Mrs. Al. Stricklin, a son.
    Jason Hartman is getting out the timbers to repair the bridge at this place.
    Rev. Moomaw will preach at the Dunkard Church next Sunday at 11 a.m.
    Mrs. Jas. Wooley had a paralytic stroke last Saturday morning and is very low.
    Messrs. Surran and the two Clark boys, of Medford, were the guests of O. P. McGee last Sunday.
    Robt. Jonas, who has been attending the normal school at Ashland this winter, has returned home.
    There was an entertainment here on Monday night of last week and those who attended seemed well pleased.
    Miss Oden, of Ashland, came up last week in company with Robt. Jonas, on her way to Elk Creek to teach school.
    Matt Pearce and his sister, Miss Grace, of Forest Creek, are visiting their aunts, Mesdames Thomas and Sinclare, of this place.
    A picked up baseball team went to Central Point Sunday from here and played that nine, which resulted in a defeat for Eagle Point.
    Mr. and Mrs. Al. Stricklin and Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Severance spent a few hours very pleasantly at the Howlett home last Thursday evening.
    John Williscroft has purchased the stock of drugs of Brown & Sons and opened up a drug store in the old Inlow building, formerly occupied by Dr. Cole.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Thomas have moved to Central Point. Charley has ordered the Mail sent to him, as he says he would not know how to keep house without it.
    Quite a number of parents and friends visited the school last Friday afternoon to listen to the entertainment. They were all pleased and threaten to go again in the near future.
    Our road supervisor seems to be very slow in getting to work on the roads, and the result is very noticeable. I have been requested to call attention to the road between here and Brownsboro.
    By special invitation nine little girls met at the residence of John Nichols and gave Miss Dollie a party one night last week. They remained overnight and all report a most delightful time.
    Ira Tungate, who went over to California to work in a sawmill, returned last week. He found the work very hard and dangerous and so irregular that it did not pay, so returned home.
    The singing class met at O. P. McGee's last Sunday afternoon and had a royal good time, as they always do when Oliver is around. They will meet at the residence of A. C. Howlett next Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock.
    Mrs. Wm. Bateman, of Medford, accompanied by her brother, Wm. Chambers, Jr., passed through here last week en route to Round Top to visit her father. They remained overnight here with Mrs. B.'s aunt, Mrs. A. M. Thomas.
    Mrs. Wm. Holmes and family, of Central Point, came out with Mrs. R. G. Brown last Saturday, to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Brown. Mr. Holmes came out on Sunday and Mrs. Harry Carlton was also there so they had a partial family reunion as most of the children were present.
Medford Mail, April 26, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Boyd Tucker, of Sams Valley, was visiting friends here last week.
    Cephas Moomaw made a business trip to Brownsboro the first of the week.
    A family by the name of Callahan has moved onto the J. O. Johnson place.
    Albert Beale, of Mt. Pitt precinct, made a business trip to Medford last Friday.
    James I. Geary and family have moved to the old Hull place, on Rogue River.
    Mrs. Wood came up from California last week to visit her daughter, Mrs. R. R. Minter.
    The singing circle will meet at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown next Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock.
    Merritt Brown, who has been visiting his sister, Mrs. Paul Van Scoy, at Montague, Calif., returned home last Saturday.
    Geo. Brown & Sons are receiving a large amount of shakes this spring, and seem to be doing a good business in that line.
    Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Pearce came over from Forest Creek last Sunday to visit Mrs. Pearce's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer.
    Mr. Tucker, of Brownsboro, passed through here the first of the week on the way home from Medford with a load of supplies.
    Joseph Freitas and family, who have been living near Derby, passed through here last Friday morning on their way to Grants Pass.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Carney and daughter, Pansy, of Jacksonville, and Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Hicks, of Medford, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown last Sunday.
    Miss Oden, who is teaching school on Elk Creek, came out last Saturday with Mr. DeCarlow and was the guest of Mrs. Jonas while Mr. DeCarlow went to Medford after supplies.
    Mrs. J. F. Brown, who has been visiting relatives at Montague, California, returned home last week. She says she is glad to get back home, as everything is so dry in that section.
    Miss Ollie Tungate, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. E. Pool, for several weeks, was the guest of Miss Mae Millsap last week. She returned to her home in Mt. Pitt precinct Sunday.
    Emanuel Pool has purchased the tools and rented the blacksmith shop of his brother, A. Pool, and will continue the business here instead of going to Jacksonville as was contemplated.
    Mr. Middlebusher had the misfortune to step on a nail a short time ago, inflicting a very painful wound. I am glad to say, however, that the wound is healing nicely and that she can walk again without the aid of a crutch.
    Mrs. John Smith, living on the John Mathews place, gave a party for her children last Friday night. A feature of the evening was the hunting for hidden peanuts, the one finding the most to receive a prize. The contest resulted in a tie, Jennie and Edna Lewis finding the same number--forty-one--so each was given a prize. The little folks had a most enjoyable time.
    Mrs. Emma Baker, who has been staying with Grandma Evans, on Big Sticky, came over last Saturday and spent the night with her sister, Mrs. E. Pool. She started Sunday morning for Mt. Pitt precinct to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tungate.
Medford Mail, May 3, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    O. P. McGee and family were the guests of T. E. Nichols and family last Sunday.
    Considerable timber is being hauled through here to different parts of the valley.
    Holmes Bros. have the timber on the ground to put in a new headgate in the mill race.
    Allen Stricklin made a business trip to Gold Hill last week. He is thinking of locating there.
    Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Daley left last week for their sawmill and expect to start the same in a few days.
    Mr. Barron, living north of Medford, has been hauling quite a lot of shakes through here to his home recently.
    Mrs. J. F. Brown received a message last week from her brother, Jesse Safford, stating that he had just arrived in San Francisco from Manila.
    Jason Hartman has been getting out the timber to put new bents under the bridge at this place and he and Benton Pool are repairing it this week.
    Quite a number of our citizens went to Brownsboro last Sunday to witness a baseball game between that nine and the F.L.I.D. Co. team. They report having had a good time. The F.L.I.D. Co. nine will play here next Sunday.
    Fred and Lee Mitchell came over from their father's place on the head of Evans Creek last week to visit some old friends in this section of the country. Lee was recently called home from Albany on account of the severe illness of his father.
     S. B. Holmes circulated a subscription paper last week soliciting for volunteer work on the county road between the west edge of the desert and Bear Creek. He met with fairly good success and work will soon commence. The supervisor proposes to make a rock road over the worst of it.
     I see in the Mail that there was to be a local teachers' institute held at Gold Hill last Saturday, and I would like to know why we can't have one at Eagle Point?  We had one here a few years ago and it proved to be a success, and the surroundings are just as good now. I believe I express the wish of every citizen in this community in inviting the superintendent and teachers to hold an institute here, and they can be assured of a hearty welcome.
Medford Mail, May 10, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    A number of hands are engaged and lively work is being done on the ditch route at present.
    Mr. and Mrs. Turner and family, of Medford, were the guests of C. Thumberg's family, a few days since.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Meyers, of Lake Creek, are the happy parents of a fine baby boy, born May 1, 1901
    John Aller, who has spent the winter with friends here, and finding his health much improved, started Tuesday for his home near Fostoria, Iowa.
    The baseball game played here recently between the Wellen and Brownsboro teams resulted 8 to 31 in favor of the ditch boys and the Brownsboro team.
    Mrs. F. M. Fredenburg, accompanied by her daughter, Delpha, is paying a visit of several days to her daughter, Mrs. Frank Adams, and family of Rogue River.
    The bridal party of Big Butte, Miss Effie Obenchain and Mr. Alfred Gordon, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Perry, called in town last Wednesday morning, while on their way to Jacksonville, where they were married. Returning in the evening they remained here for the May Day dance. The best wishes of their many friends were tendered the happy couple
Medford Mail, May 10, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Walter Robinett is working for the Fish Lake Irrigation Company.
    John Ashpole, our road supervisor, did some good work on the roads last week.
    Our stockmen have been gathering their cattle together to take to the mountain range.
    Scott Pool and family have gone to Little Applegate to visit his sister, Mrs. Saltmarsh.
    Roy McGee came up from Josephine County last week to help his father with the cattle.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ulrich, of Medford, were the guests of Mrs. O. P. McGee last Friday.
    Lee Edmondson came out from Big Butte last week to help Mr. McGee take his cattle to the range.
    J. S. Howard, of Medford, was out last week surveying a tract of land which he had sold to Frank Pool.
    The superintendent of the Fish Lake Irrigation Company was here last week looking for hands to work on the ditch.
    Rev. Moomaw was called to Talent last week to officiate at the funeral of Mr. Minear, who died at his home near Jacksonville, May 6th.
    Lin Purdin was out from Medford last week soliciting orders for Hicks & Walker's marble works. He succeeded fairly well in this section.
    County School Superintendent Daily came out to visit our school last Thursday, remaining overnight with O. P. McGee. He speaks very highly of the school.
     J. Hartman and Benton and Frank Pool have finished their work on the Eagle Point bridge. They went to Elk Creek last week to work on the bridge there.
     R. R. Kaylor and E. E. Routhson, who have been trapping on the headwaters of Rogue River, passed through town last Monday. They reported having had good success.
     Your correspondent made a trip to Sterling last Saturday, taking with him his two daughters, Hattie and Agnes, who will visit for awhile with their sister, Mrs. J. M. Lewis, and family. We visited the mine Saturday night, Mr. Allen, the night foreman, kindly showing us everything that could be seen by lamplight. They are rushing the work at the mine night and day.
     Harry Cingcade had a narrow escape from being killed one day last week, while hauling rock to the road between the desert and Bear Creek. His team became frightened and ran away, when one of the dump boards slipped off, one end of it catching in the ground and the other striking Harry, who was on the wagon, in the stomach and rendering him unconscious. At last accounts he was able to be around.
    We had a genuine smallpox scare here last week. A man by the name of Jaquette passed through here, and a few days later word was received from Montague that he was ill with the smallpox at that place. The report has since been circulated that are several cases of that disease on Butte Creek, but there is not, nor has there been for several years, a case in this section. If there should be one I will report it through the Mail, but at present there is no danger.
Medford Mail, May 17, 1901, page 5



Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Mr. Copeland, of Talent, called in town Thursday. He is in this section looking for a location.
    Miss Sophia Ratrie returned home with Miss Carrie Sackett of Medford, for a few days' visit during school vacation.
    Major Barron, near Medford, has been hauling several large loads of shakes, which he purchased from Benj. Fredenburg, of Big Butte.
    Farm work is very quiet. This is seemingly the farmer's resting time of the year and gives him an opportunity to look after his interests in other directions.
    Mr. J. M. McCallister, of the McCallister Springs, met with quite a serious accident the other day. She was shelling corn by holding the ear in one hand and striking with a hatchet with the other and made an accidental stroke, cutting the ends off her first and second fingers. At last accounts the wounds, though severe, were improving.
    Arthur Jaquette, of Montague, while visiting relatives above Lake Creek became somewhat sick, though not seriously, and returned home a few days later. On reaching home his physician pronounced his malady smallpox. This caused considerable uneasiness in this section of the country and Drs. Jones & Shearer were called to the different localities to vaccinate the people. The schools have all been closed for a short time, or until it is seen how things terminate, and every precaution is being taken to prevent the disease from scattering, should anyone take it. At present, no cases have developed.
Medford Mail, May 17, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Jno. Williscroft, the druggist, has just received a fine assortment of goods.
    The Eicher family passed through Eagle Point Monday en route to the big ditch.
    Wm. Beale, of Mt. Pitt, came to town Sunday with a load of shakes for Geo. Brown & Sons.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. P. True, of Griffin Creek, were visiting Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Severance last Saturday and Sunday.
    Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, of Ft. Klamath, visited her parents here last week. She returned Saturday by the way of Ager, Calif.
    Mr. Bish, a traveling salesman, and a noted angler, spent time Sunday here and improved the time indulging in his favorite sport.
    The rain we had last week was a great help to the farmers and gardeners in this section of the country, as the crops were needing rain.
    A. J. Daley, one of our leading merchants and a magnetic healer, is meeting with considerable success. He has an ad elsewhere in this paper.
    W. Pool came down from Elk Creek last Sunday after provisions. He is helping Jason Hartman on the Elk Creek bridge and reports work progressing rapidly.
    Our school closed when the smallpox scare came on and last week the directors met and decided not to have any more school until fall, as there were but a few more weeks in this term.
    Arrangements have been made for the Jacksonville baseball team to come out and play the Eagle Point nine next Sunday. Our boys will probably play for the purse at Jacksonville the Fourth.
    Walter Robinett, who is working in the blacksmith shop for the Fish Lake Ditch Company, was compelled to remain at home a few days last week on account of illness, but returned to his post this week.
    Mrs. R. Sinclare sold her residence and most of her household goods last week to a Mr. Morton, consideration  $300. She has moved to Central Point for the present, but expects to go to Missouri in a short time.
    O. P. McGee returned from Rancheria last Saturday, where he has been to take his cattle for the summer range. Frank Foster accompanied him to the ranch and reports it one of the finest stock ranches he ever saw and the feed in that section fine.
Medford Mail, May 24, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    A. J. Florey had a new hitching rack put up near his store last week.
    A. J. Daley is preparing to start up his sawmill on Round Top soon.
    Joseph Rader has put up a windmill and large tank on the old home place.
    T. Dugan has been getting out material to build a new barn on his farm.
    John Rader is getting out the material for a new residence on his home place.
    Miss Lottie Perry came out from Medford last week to visit her sister, Mrs. J. W. Grover.
    George Brown & Sons have torn down their old barn and are building a large one where it stood.
    A large amount of lumber is being hauled out this spring from the various sawmills on Big Butte.
    The Jacksonville ball team did not put in an appearance here last Sunday, as was announced last week.
    Mrs. R. R. Minter died at her home on Sunday, May 26th. A more extended notice will be given next week.
    Mr. Morton, who recently bought the Sinclare property, has been making some substantial improvements on the place.
    Frank Brown, while working on Brown & Sons' new barn, cut the end of one of his thumbs open with a saw, making an ugly wound.
    Messrs. Kempner and John Ethell came over to Eagle Point last week after a load of posts which they purchased from Brown & Sons.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Severance, Mrs. Marshall Garrett, Mrs. J. F. Brown and Miss Mae Millsap were the guests of Mrs. Howlett Sunday.
    Messrs. Warner and Ulrich came out from Medford last week, the former to look after the prospective onion crop, and the latter to look after his stock.
    Mr. Howard, the road supervisor of district No. 12, has been doing considerable work on the Severance hill road leading out of town to the north and east.
    Mrs. Argalee Green returned from St. Joseph, Missouri, last week for a visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, and her son, Austin, who has been living with his grandparents for some time.
    Mrs. Olie Henderson has returned from California, where she has been to care for her husband, who is engaged in mining in that country, and who has been quite ill. We are glad to learn that he is now convalescent.
    F. A. Stricklin came over from Table Rock last Friday after his wife and baby and while here paid a year's subscription to the Mail, as he wants to hear from his friends every week and takes that method of doing so. He expects to engage in the fishery business this summer.
    Mrs. C. Ethell and son came over from Big Sticky last Sunday to visit her sister, Mrs. A. Pool. The lady, accompanied by her son, is here from Iowa upon a visit to her mother, Grandma Evans, who is now past ninety years of age. Mrs. Ethell, who is in her seventy-third year, had not seen her mother for about forty years.
Medford Mail, May 31, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Alex. McDonald left Tuesday for Montague, Calif.
    Miss Sophia Ratrie, who has been visiting friends in Medford, returned home Sunday.
    S. F. Hutchinson and family, late of Washington, spent Saturday night in town, while en route to their new home on Big Butte.
    Miss Mabel Bell returned home Saturday from a trip to Woodville, where she spent several days with her sister, Miss Donna, who is teaching in that vicinity.
    Mrs. D. E. Morris and Miss Nora Charley were in town Tuesday. While here Mrs. M. purchased a pony from some parties and expects to take in horseback riding among other pleasures, while rusticating in this vicinity this summer.
    J. M. Howard, on returning from a trip last Tuesday, to his surprise and consternation found his home deserted, his wife having taken their three-year-old son and gone away. Mr. Howard claims that he knew of no trouble which would warrant such a step and is grief-stricken over the loss of his child. He has since learned that Mrs. H. has gone to San Francisco to live with a sister. (Chas. Thumburg was arrested last Saturday on a warrant sworn to by Mr. Howard, charging him with kidnapping his wife and child. He was to have been tried at Jacksonville Wednesday, but the prosecuting witness failed to appear and Thumburg was discharged. Ed.)
Medford Mail, May 31, 1901, page 3



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Irvin Daley, of the north fork of Little Butte, was here on business last week.
    Chas. Carney and A. H. Walker were here last week working in the interest of the Oregon Granite Co., of Medford.
    Scott Pool and family have returned from Applegate, where they went to remain until the smallpox scare was over.
    Mr. Ringer, who is doing some painting and papering in Central Point, came up home last Thursday on a business trip.
    T. W. Burge, a railroad man, and his wife, of Portland, were visiting in Eagle Point last Sunday, the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Howlett.
    Mr. and Mrs. David Ball, of Woodville, came up last week to visit Mrs. B's mother, Mrs. Heckathorn. They returned home Sunday.
    Road Supervisor Howard has had a force of men at work up the hill road leading from town and deserves much credit for the amount of work accomplished.
    O. P. McGee was summoned to Josephine County last week to be at the bedside of his mother, who is quite seriously ill. At last accounts she was no better.
    During the last week there has been a vast number of strangers in our town, and most of them inquiring about timber land on Big Butte and Rogue River. We anticipate a rush in that line of business this summer.
   John Williscroft, our druggist, has purchased the Brophy McAndrews goats that were advertised in the Mail, and has taken them to his ranch southeast of town, where Mr. Middlebusher will have charge of them.
    Mrs. E. Pool, who has been visiting her parents near Mt. Pitt, has returned home. She was accompanied by Mrs. Chris. Beale, who was on her way to Portland, and her sisters, Mrs. Emma Baker and Miss Ollie Tungate.
    Rev. Moomaw went to Talent last Saturday to attend the semiannual love feast of the German Baptist Church. He requests the Mail to say that he will preach here next Sunday and at the Dewey school house on the following Sunday at 11 a.m.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. F. Robinett and Scott Pool and family went up to where the Fish Lake Irrigation Co. are working one day last week. They report considerable work being done and that the company have about thirty men and two ten-horse plows at work.
    M. F. Edgerton and D. H. Jackson, of Ashland, were here last week examining the formation of the rock, and trying to organize a company to prospect for oil. They were quite favorably impressed with the prospect and state that oil may be found in this section in paying quantities.
    Died--Near Eagle Point, May 26, 1901, at the family residence of R. R. Minter, Mrs. Beatrice Minter, aged thirty-four years, three months and seventeen days. The deceased leaves a husband and seven children to mourn her loss, besides a host of friends. Mrs. Minter was a kind and loving wife and mother and a true friend. The sorrowing husband and children have the sympathy of the entire community. Mrs. Minter was born in Yamhill County, Or., in 1867. She was the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Wood, of Alturas, Modoc County, Calif. She was married to R. R. Minter, of this place, in December 1885. We all grieve for our loved ones when they go to the great unknown, but when the Angel of Death enters our homes and calls away our loved ones to a better home beyond the skies, we should try to make our lives such that when we too are called away to that better land, we shall meet our loved ones there.
Medford Mail, June 7, 1901, page 5



Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Mr. Baber of Grants Pass was in town Monday.
    The haying season is just opening in this section of the country.
    Mr. Meeker, of Rogue River, was on a business trip to town Tuesday.
    Mrs. James Martin, of Phoenix, accompanied by her daughter, Anna, and the younger children, visited with friends in this vicinity last week.
    Mrs. F. M. Fredenburg and daughter, Delpha, who have spent the winter and spring here for school advantages, moved with her son, Jesse, to Big Butte, where they will spend the summer.
Medford Mail, June 14, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    W. I. Vawter, of Medford, was here upon business on Tuesday of last week.
    Frank Pool is engaged this week in putting in a new headgate in the mill race.
    A. J. Daley and W. R. Potter have sold their interests in the Elk Creek mines to Dr. Ray, of Gold Hill.
    Misses Lottie Pankey and Lelah Williams, of Central Point, were visiting friends in this section one day last week.
    Mate Clemens, formerly of this place, but who now resides in Eastern Oregon, was smiling on his old friends here last Sunday.
    Mrs. Wood, mother of the late Mrs. R. R. Minter, who has been here for some time, returned to her home in California last week.
    A. J. Daley, the magnetic healer, was called to Griffin Creek last Sunday to treat J. P. True's son for rheumatism. He rendered relief in a short time.
    Floyd Pearce and family came over from Forest Creek last week to visit Mrs. Pearce's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, and her sister, Mrs. Argelee Green.
    Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Davis have moved onto the Geo. Heckathorn place, where they will remain until after haying time, when they will go to Washington.
    On Monday morning of last week there was a light frost along the streams, doing some damage to the corn, squashes, etc., a very unusual occurrence for this time of the year.
    One day last week, while Mrs. John Ashpole was gathering up the eggs in the barn on their place on Rogue River, she saw a large rattlesnake. She hastily procured a pitchfork and ran one tine through the body of the snake, thus pinning it to the hay. She then got the hoe and killed the reptile.
    There is considerable satisfaction in this section of the county on account of the action of the county court in regard to the location of the free ferry. A petition was circulated and presented to the court requesting the relocation of the ferry where it would accommodate a large number of the people living on the north side of the river, without their having to go four miles up the river in order to cross when they come here to mill or to trade.
    Quite a number of people came out from Jacksonville, Medford and Central Point last Sunday to witness the game of baseball between the Jacksonville and Eagle Point nines. The score stood 12 to 8, in favor of Eagle Point. The game was the most hotly contested one ever played on our grounds. The Eagle Point and Medford teams will play on the Jacksonville grounds next Sunday, the victors to play against the Jacksonville team on the Fourth.
Medford Mail, June 14, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Everybody in this section of the country are busy haying.
    Mr. Lofland is erecting a large barn on his place below town.
    J. J. Fryer and family went to Medford last week to consult Dr. Darrin.
    Mrs. Porter Robinett, of Hornbrook, Calif., is here visiting friends and relatives.
    Judge Crowell, of Medford, went through here last Saturday on his way up Rogue River.
    Robt. Jonas, who is teaching in the Leeds district, made a business trip to Medford last Saturday.
    Thos. Fredenburg and family stopped overnight with Mr. Martin and family last Friday night.
    Last Saturday R. R. Minter's team ran away with a mowing machine and almost completely demolished it.
    Several of our citizens went to Jacksonville last Sunday to witness the game of baseball between Medford and Eagle Point.
    Mr. Wakefield, the sawmill man of Big Butte, passed through here the first of last week with a load of water pipe for his mill.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Carlton, of Wellen, accompanied by Mrs. Harry Carlton, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown last Sunday.
    Mrs. J. V. Layne, of Medford, who is working in the interest of the Viavi Medicine Co., lectured to the ladies here last Saturday evening.
    Hon. and Mrs. Chauncey Nye, of Flounce Rock precinct, came out last Saturday and went to Medford. They were accompanied by two of their grandchildren, the little Florey girls.
    Jas. Vanderkarr, of Medford, passed through here last Saturday on his way home from the big ditch, where he has been working. He was called home on account of illness in his family.
    Rev. Moomaw will preach here next Sunday at 11 a.m. He requests a large attendance as he has something of importance to say to the people. Rev. Eby, of Jacksonville, will preach here the following Sunday. Everybody welcome.
Medford Mail, June 21, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    The usual summer rush to the mountains is already being inaugurated.
    Many men are bringing their families with them and together are camping out during the summer while the men are working along the ditch line.
    John Cook, late from Washington, having traded for Mrs. McFerren's property on Salt Creek, has taken possession of the same, while Mrs. McFerren and family moved out toward the valley Tuesday.
    The people of South Butte are again coming at the front with a general celebration on our national holiday. A good time is assured, and all are cordially invited to participate in the general pleasures of the day.
    Miss Madge Wright, of Big Butte, in company with Mr. Geo. Cottrell, of Roxy Ann precinct, called last Tuesday while on their way to Medford, where they were married. They have the best wishes of their many friends for future happiness and success.
Medford Mail, June 21, 1901, page 3



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mrs. W. B. Haymond will leave this week for Yreka to spend the Fourth.
    Rev. Eby, of Jacksonville, will preach here next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m.
    Alex Davis and family started for Washington this week, where he expects to work in a sawmill.
    Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Thomas came out from Central Point last Saturday for a visit with relatives and friends.
    Miss Floy Florey has gone to Flounce Rock, where she expects to remain for some time with her grandparents.
    Mrs. George Daley, Sr. and her daughter, Maggie, came out from the Round Top mill last week for short visit with friends.
    The Eagle Point ball team went to Jacksonville Sunday and played against the Jacksonville boys, the game resulting in favor of Eagle Point.
    A. J. Daley calls attention this week to his ability to cure disease without medicine, and presents an endorsement from J. I. Patton, of Big Butte.
     Mrs. Edward Simon, of Tolo, was here last week visiting relatives and friends. She was accompanied home by her sister-in-law, Mrs. Porter Robinett.
    Scott Pool came near being badly hurt one day last week while riding horseback. The horse stumbled and fell, throwing him off and nearly dislocating his shoulder.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lozier and two sons and Miss Anna Jeffrey, of Medford, and Mrs. Kelso and daughter, Miss Alta Wood, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Severance last Sunday.
    Joseph Rader had a narrow escape one day last week while raking hay. His team became unmanageable and he fell off the rake in front of the teeth, and had not the tongue dropped down he might have been badly hurt. As it was, he escaped with a few bruises, but the rake was demolished.
    Floyd Pearce, of Forest Creek, came over last Saturday after his wife and baby. He was accompanied by his cousins Aaron Pearce and Mrs. Sallie A. Collins and Miss Della Fisher, recent arrival from Colorado. Mr. Pearce and Mrs. Collins are the guests of their aunt, Mrs. A. M. Thomas.
    D. H. Jackson and M. F. Eggleston, of Ashland, are here again. The former represents an oil company and the latter is an oil expert. They are securing the right to bore for oil on different farms and are bonding the land for twenty years. They seem to be quite sanguine that oil and coal can be found, and quite a number of our farmers have bonded their land.
    One of our plucky ranch women saw a large hawk catch one of her chickens a few days ago, and she was so exasperated that she seized a gun, loaded it (she is not an expert at loading a gun), and fired. The result was a bruised shoulder, a bursted gun and a dead hawk. She thinks that the next time she loads a gun she will measure the powder and shot.
Medford Mail, June 28, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Born--to Mr. and Mrs. Harry Carlton, June 28, 1901, a daughter.
    Miss Tavia Howlett spent the day with home folks last Sunday.
    Jas. Howard and Col. Geer were traveling through here one day last week.
    Miss Lottie Perry has gone to Benicia, Calif. to visit her sister, Mrs. R. O. Stine.
    Miss Dora Martin passed through here last week on her way to her home on Trail Creek.
    Thom. Cingcade and Misses Anna and Lottie Pankey were the guests of Mrs. Howlett last Sunday.
    E. Hanley, of Silver Lake, a cousin of the Hanleys of this valley, is stopping here at the present.
    Mrs. Nelson, of Edgewood, Calif., a relative of O. P. McGee and family, spent a night with them one night last week.
    Married--June 30, 1901, at the residence of Jacob Walch, John D. Holst and Bertha Walch, Rev. J. P. Moomaw officiating.
    Jerry Heckathorn went to Woodville Monday to spend the Fourth. He will be accompanied home by his brother-in-law, Mr. Meagley, and family.
    Our road supervisor, John Ashpole, has had a load of bridge plank hauled to be used in reflooring the approach on the north end of the bridge at this place.
    A. J. Daley, our magnetic healer, presents to the readers of the Mail this week an endorsement from Mrs. J. E. Geary, a lady who was a resident of our town for years.
    Mrs. Sallie A. Collins and Miss Fishel, who have been visiting relatives here, started last Sunday for their home in Colorado, being called there by sickness in the family.
    Miss Mae Millsap, of Ashland, finished a very successful term of school in the Antelope district last Friday. She is so highly appreciated by the patrons of the school that the directors have secured her for another term.
    O. P. McGee and family returned last week from Josephine County, where they had been to attend the funeral of Mr. McGee's mother. While there their son, Donnie, was taken sick and was unable to return with them, but returned Saturday.
    As Mrs. W. R. Potter is constantly receiving new goods in her racket and millinery store, she wants to keep up with the times in the way of news also, so she has concluded to subscribe for the leading newspaper in Southern Oregon, the Medford Mail.
    Rev. Eby and family came out from Jacksonville last Sunday and were the guests of Rev. and Mrs. Moomaw. The reverend gentleman preached here in the morning to a fair congregation. L. D. Minear and family, living near Jacksonville, also came out to attend church and have a picnic dinner on the banks of our beautiful Little Butte Creek.
Medford Mail, July 5, 1901, page 5



Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    The haying season is just over in this vicinity.
    Wm. McKee, of Big Butte, was on a business trip in this part of the country the first of the week.
    W. H. Meeker and party, of Medford, passed through town Monday on their way home from a mountain excursion.
    J. H. Hammersley, accompanied by his father, of Gold Hill, called in town Monday while on their way to McCallister Springs.
    In the same pretty grove, as described two years ago, near a very cool spring, the people of South Butte met to commemorate our national holiday. The program was admirably presided over by J. R. Tyrrell, and consisted of songs, the reading of the Declaration and recitations, which were effectively rendered, and at the close of which sumptuous dinners were spread from well-filled baskets and everybody invited to the generous hospitality. The baseball game in the afternoon between the Brownsboro and Lake Creek teams resulted in favor of the former. The party at night was largely attended. A general success was voted over the whole time by both the home people and the numbers from abroad.
Medford Mail, July 12, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    The sound of harvesters is beginning to be heard in this neighborhood.
    S. B. Holmes has torn down the old Inlow barn and is erecting a new one in its stead.
    Our road supervisor, John Ashpole, has refloored the approach at the north end of the bridge at this place.
    Miss Corum passed through here Saturday on her way to Big Butte, where she is engaged to teach school.
    Quite a number of our citizens went to the different towns in the valley to celebrate the Fourth. All report having had a good time.
    A. J. Daley calls the attention of the readers of the Mail this week to what Mrs. Scott Pool has to say in regard to his ability to relieve pain.
    Thomas Henderson, who has been in California for some time looking after his mining interests, returned last week to his home near this place.
    The school directors of this district have engaged Miss Richardson to teach the primary department of our school this fall and winter.
    A Mr. Comstock, of South Dakota, was here last week looking for a location. He seemed favorably impressed with our country and its possibilities.
    Scott Pool went to the range last Sunday to look after his horses. There seems to have been some trouble of late in regard to horses being driven off the range.
    Mr. DeCarlow, of Elk Creek, came out last Saturday with a bunch of cattle for Wm. Ulrich. He delivered the cattle at the ranch here, going on to Medford the same day.
    Ed Hanley, of Humboldt County, California, who is stopping here at present, has sold his interest in the Gray Eagle silver mine, at Salt Lake, to R. H. McDonnell; consideration, $1300.
    The Central Point ball club came out last Sunday and played against a picked-up team of our boys. The score stood 22 to 11, in favor of Eagle Point. Quite a number of young people came out from Central Point to witness the game.
Medford Mail, July 12, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. Edward Simon, of Tolo, visited relatives and friends here last week.
    Chris Beale, of Mt. Pitt precinct, visited Jacksonville several days last week.
    Frank Foster made a trip to Ashland last Sunday, combining business with pleasure.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent made a business trip to Big Butte the first of the week.
    Porter Robinett came over from Hurley, Calif., last Friday for a visit with relatives and friends.
    W. R. Potter has purchased about forty tons of baled hay of J. W. Grover at $9 per ton at the press.
    Business seems to be on the increase in our town, as our leading merchants are constantly receiving new goods.
    Robt. Came, a former resident of this place, later of Illinois, is here for a visit and will probably remain for some time.
    Miss Ollie Tungate, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. E. Pool, returned to her home in Mt. Pitt precinct last week.
    The young people of this vicinity had a social dance here last Saturday evening, which proved to be a very pleasant affair.
    Quite a number of people have been passing here of late on their way to Klamath County to engage in haying in that section.
    The A. J. Daley sawmill on Round Top is running again, and as soon as the roads can be worked a little lumber will be hauled from there.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brown, accompanied by Mr. B.'s sister, Mrs. S. B. Holmes, and his mother, Mrs. Geo. Brown, spent last Friday with S. A. Carlton and family.
    Mrs. Porter Robinett returned from the Daley sawmill last week, where she has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Geo. Daley, Sr., who returned home with Mrs. Robinett.
    A. McNeil, one of the oldest pioneers in the county if not of the state, who was partially paralyzed for some time, has had another stroke of paralysis and is very low.
    Wort. Pool and family took a trip to Big Butte last week, where Jason Hartman is building a new bridge. They were accompanied by Mrs. Frank Pool, whose husband is employed on the bridge.
Medford Mail, July 19, 1901, page 5



Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Fishing is good along the creek at present.
    C. A. Edmondson, of Big Butte, has just finished a contract of delivering several thousand fine shakes to J. K. Bell.
    Miss Donna Bell is spending the vacation at home after closing a very successful term of school near Woodville.
    Miss Cressie Norton closed her school at Lake Creek last Friday with an entertainment. She returned to her home in Ashland last Tuesday.
    A lively game of baseball was played here last Sunday between the Lake Creek and Brownsboro teams, resulting in a score of 15 to 18 in favor of the former.
Medford Mail, July 19, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Miss Etta Wilson was the guest of Miss Mattie Taylor last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. Pool were the guests of Wort. Pool last Sunday.
    Mrs. Tice, of Medford, was visiting friends in this vicinity last week.
    R. G. Brown and family were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Carlton last Sunday.
    Mrs. John Rader and Mrs. H. T. Severance were the guests of Mrs. Howlett last Sunday.
    Miss Oden, who has been teaching on Elk Creek, has closed her school. She was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Jonas last Sunday night.
    John Cooke, who recently had his hand quite badly cut on a saw while working at the Reeser sawmill, passed through here last week on his way home.
    J. Hartman, the bridge builder, stopped with us one night last week. He is working on the Big Butte bridge at present. While here he subscribed for the Mail.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brown, Misses Mattie and Lottie Taylor and Etta Wilson, Merritt Brown and Lloyd Wade took a trip to the head of the Fish Lake Ditch last Sunday.
    Perry McGee came up from Josephine County last week. He was accompanied by his niece, Miss Stella McGee, who has been visiting relatives there for some time.
    Frank Brown and S. B. Holmes recently went on an outing and fishing excursion. They succeeded in buying some fish and returned home fully satisfied with their outing.
    A. J. Daley, our magnetic healer, presents to the readers of the Mail this week what Rev. J. P. Moomaw has to say in regard to his ability to relieve the suffering caused by sprains and rheumatism.
    Mr. Cline and family, accompanied by Wm. Smith, passed through here last Sunday on their way to the upper Rogue River country, where they are engaged in making shakes and hauling them to Medford.
    C. E. Kirk, of Yamhill County, Oregon, who is working in the interest of the American Sunday school Union, was here the first of last week and assisted in the reorganization of our Sunday school. O. P. McGee was elected superintendent, W. R. Potter assistant superintendent, and Mrs. J. W. Grover secretary and treasurer. The Sunday school will be held next Sunday at 10 o'clock.
    Your correspondent made a business trip to Rancheria the first of last week. Talking about fat stock, Mr. Ulrich and Mr. McGee have about four hundred head of cattle on the ranch and they are looking fine. While on the road I stopped and took dinner with those whole-souled people, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Chambers, Jr., who are living on the old Dunlap place. While I was there they decided to subscribe for the Mail, as they want to keep posted on all general topics. Mr. Chambers was putting up a fine lot of hay for future use.
Medford Mail, July 26, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Ira Tungate of Mr. Pitt precinct, has purchased a new organ.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Coy, July 21, 1901, a daughter.
    John Williscroft, the druggist, was called to Medford last Saturday.
    Mrs. Settles, of East Medford, was the guest of Mrs. Moomaw last week.
    Emanuel Pool is making preparations to build an addition onto his home.
    Merchant Daley is having lumber hauled for the erection of a new store house.
    Wm. Mitchell and family, of Evans Creek, were the guests of Geo. W. Daley, Jr., last Sunday.
    Peter Robinett and family, of Hornbrook, who have been visiting in this section, returned home last week.
    Mrs. C. H. Jones, nee Lelah Fryer, arrived from Seattle last week on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer.
    Mrs. Rhoda Miller and family in company with Mr. Roper and family and Mr. and Mrs. Millsap, all of Ashland, stopped overnight here one night last week en route home from Crater Lake.
    The extreme dry weather is affecting the water supply in this section. One well that up to this year has always had about forty feet of water in it has just about gone dry, and some of the springs in this locality have gone entirely dry.
    Jas. Lewis and son, Eddie, of the Sterling district, came up last week. Mr. Lewis reports the mines in that section shut down now for the purpose of cleaning up. Eddie remained for a few days with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Howlett.
    Last Sunday at the close of the Sunday school, Rev. Moomaw lectured to the children. He gave a fine talk and held the attention of the entire school, numbering in all about forty children. In the afternoon he lectured at the Brownsboro Sunday school.
    Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Pearce, of Forest Creek, came over last week and spent a few days with Mrs. Pearce's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer. Mr. Pearce left Sunday morning for Eastern Oregon, where he goes to seek a location, he having leased his mine for two years.
    Frank Poole, the carpenter, is kept quite busy these times. He is now engaged on the Elk Creek bridge and has several jobs awaiting him here. When a good mechanic like Mr. Poole locates in a prosperous community like this, he can always find plenty of employment.
    Alfred Letcher and family of Tillamook County, arrived here last week and have rented the old Haselton property. He is a jeweler and expects to follow that line of business here, and if circumstances seem to justify, he will handle wagons and musical instruments in connection with his regular trade. His oldest daughter, Miss Florence, is a music teacher, and an effort is already being made to organize her a class in music. They come well recommended by the local papers of their town.
    Misses Jessie and Lillie Gregory and Mr. Nye, of Medford, spent last Sunday here, the guest of Mrs. A. J. Florey. While here, in company with Miss Ethyl Florey, the party went on a little fishing excursion. They succeeded in catching one fish about four inches long, which our fish inspector decided was a polliwog. However, they had a good time and went home feeling greatly refreshed after their day's outing. Later:--The fish caught by the ladies and Mr. Nye was purloined and afterwards retaken, and our justice of the peace forwarded it to them Monday morning by mail.
Medford Mail, August 2, 1901, page 5




Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    James Cline has moved his family into the Coy house.
    Mrs. J. K. Bell was doing business in our town last week.
    John Rader has commenced to haul the lumber in to build his new house.
    A. Pool and son, Benton, went to Salem last week to visit Mr. Pool's daughter and family.
    Scott Pool and family moved up to the Fish Lake Ditch last week, where he expects to remain for a while.
    Mr. DeCarlow, of Elk Creek, returned from a trip to Gold Hill and Ashland last week, stopping overnight here.
    Our people are considerably elated over the prospect of a ditch being brought from Rogue River to this section of the country.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey went to Prospect the first of the week to spend a few weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey Nye.
    Miss Tavia Howlett was visiting friends in Ashland last week, the guest of Mrs. Mae Millsap. She returned home Saturday.
    Mrs. E. Pool went to Mt. Pitt last week to spend a few weeks during the hot weather with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tungate.
    It is evident that a great deal of building is being done, as scarcely a day passes but what several loads of lumber, shingles and shakes are hauled through our town.
    A. Letcher, recently from Tillamook, has rented a part of Joe Wilson's shop and has opened a jewelry store. He is also prepared to supply the traveling public with baled hay.
    The weather is breaking all previous records. Last Sunday the thermometer registered 108 in as cool a place as could be found in our town and 116 at the post office, but still there are no prostrations or sunstrokes, and men work right along as though this was nothing unusual.
    Mrs. Winninger, a sister of the late Aaron Chambers, who has been visiting the family of Col. Maury, near Jacksonville, came over last Sunday in company with Henry Maury and his sister, Miss Mollie, to visit her niece, Mrs. A. N. Thomas. Mrs. Thomas' son, Charles, and wife of Central Point, were also visiting her Sunday.
    Andrew McNeil died on July 31, 1901, after a lingering illness, aged eighty-five years and five months. Mr. McNeil was born in Randolph County, Indiana, March 1, 1816, and came to Jackson County, Oregon, in 1852. He was married to Mary E. Mathews on August 2, 1869. He leaves a wife and three children and a host of friends to mourn his loss.
Medford Mail, August 9, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Commissioner Riley, of Antelope, was in town upon business Monday.
    Messrs. Bradshaw and Stevens are starting up their threshing machine this week.
    Comb brothers of Ashland spent the noon hour in town Monday while on their return from taking a party of tourists to the Dead Indian springs.
    Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Prall, of Central Point, were visiting with Mrs. Prall's parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Cox, of Big Butte, this week.
    John Mann, of Sams Valley, was taken suddenly and severely ill with a reattack of an old malady while working on the ditch last week. He was taken to his home Friday where since then death has relieved him from his sufferings.
Medford Mail, August 9, 1901, page 3



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Benj. Higinbotham spent a few days in Eagle Point last week.
    R. R. Minter is also erecting a new barn on the old Mensor place.
    Walter Woods is erecting a new barn on the place he bought from Dan Gray.
    The headers have about completed their work in this section of the country.
    Frank and Irvin Pool and John Smith made a business trip to Medford one day last week.
    Mrs. Harry Carlton has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Brown, for a few days.
    Misses Alta Wood and Anna Noah were the guests of the former's sister, Mrs. James Cline, a few days this week.
    Holmes Bros. are putting grain bins in their warehouse so as to avoid using so many sacks to hold their wheat.
    Misses Donna Mabel and Bessie Bell and Sophia Ratrie, of Brownsboro, were pleasant callers on Eagle Point friends Sunday.
    Mr. Noah and daughter, Miss Anna, spent Sunday with James Cline and family, returning to their home in Sams Valley Monday.
    There is a great deal of travel on this road a present, some hauling lumber, while others are en route to the different summer resorts.
    Mr. W. A. Davidson of Medford, who has been working on the F.L. Ditch, came down last week to be treated by him for rheumatism.
    A dance was given at the hall last Friday night. There was a large crowd in attendance and all report having an enjoyable time.
    A gentleman from Phoenix lectured at the old school house last Sunday evening to a large audience. His subject was "Life's Railway to Heaven."
    Miss Mollie Nichols, of Sams Valley, was the guest of Mrs. Elva Middlebusher a few days last week. She was accompanied home by Miss Middlebusher.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Howlett, accompanied by their daughters, Hattie and Agnes, left last Wednesday for Ft. Klamath, to visit their daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt.
    E. Pool went to Mt. Pitt one day last week. He returned home Sunday, accompanied by Mrs. Pool, who has been spending a few weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tungate.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory, of Big Sticky, were the guests of Mrs. A. M. Thomas one day last week. They were accompanied home by Mrs. Winninger, who has been visiting Mrs. Thomas.
    The question often comes up when I solicit ads for the Mail whether these ads do any good, and as an evidence that they do, we will call the attention of the readers of the Mail to the fact that Mr. A. J. Daley has been inserting brief testimonials in the Mail, and the result is people are coming from a distance to be treated by him.
    A few days ago three men from Minnesota passed through our town on their way to the timber belt and expressed their surprise at finding stores at Eagle Point containing a general assortment of goods, and remarked that if they had known that there were such stores out here they would have come out and bought their supplies. See the advantage of advertising.
Medford Mail, August 16, 1901, page 5


A Brownsboro Item.
    George Brown, the young architect, with Manley Conley at the helm, are nearing the completion of the storehouse they have erected in Brownsboro. The former contemplates engaging in the mercantile business in the near future. George is a young man who possesses unsurpassed qualities. In profession he is a facsimile of his father, and knowing him to be very delinquent [sic] we predict for him a brilliant future. Much credit is due Manley Conley for ingenuity displayed and interest manifested in so hazardous an undertaking, which impresses us that there is nothing difficult to him who wills.
Medford Mail, August 16, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mr. Ringer, the painter, who is at present working in Central Point, spent last Sunday here.
    J. J. Fryer and family spent last Sunday at the farm of W. W. French, on Rogue River.
    County Commissioner Thomas Riley was smiling on his Eagle Point friends last Sunday.
    Mrs. Officer, of Grass Valley, Calif., arrived last Saturday for a visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Brown.
    Quite a number of the little friends of Miss Nora Daley gave her a surprise birthday party last Sunday. All report a very pleasant time.
    Our school will commence the second Monday in September, with Prof. Bish as principal and Miss Richardson as teacher of the primary department.
    Quite a number of our baseball enthusiasts went to Jacksonville last Sunday to witness the game between Grants Pass and a Jackson County team.
    Frank and Benton Pool are working on John Rader's house, and as soon as that is completed Frank Pool will commence work on Mr. Daley's new store house.
    About twenty-five of the music lovers of our little city met at the church last Sunday afternoon and spent the time singing. They will meet next Sunday at 4 p.m.
    John Hart and Robt. Came accompanied Mrs. Smith to Medford one day last week, where she took the train for her home in Yreka. Mrs. Smith is a sister of Mr. Hart.
    There will be preaching at the Dunkard Church next Sunday. In all probability the services will be conducted by a gentleman from Talent, but if not Rev. Moomaw will preach.
    I am requested to state to the readers of the Mail in this section that arrangements have been made so that the old school books can be exchanged for the new series at A. J. Florey's.
    Walter Robinett came down from the Fish Lake Ditch last Friday night and telephoned to Medford for a doctor for Fred Mitchell, who was taken suddenly ill, caused by being jarred by a premature explosion of a blast.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey and two children returned last Friday from a visit with her parents at Flounce Rock. She was accompanied by her brother, Nelson Nye, who returned home Saturday, taking Miss Floy Florey with him.
    Our Sunday school is progressing nicely, there being about forty in regular attendance. An effort was made last Sunday to procure more song books, and there is strong talk of purchasing an organ for Sunday school and church purposes.
----
JOTTINGS WHILE EN ROUTE TO FT. KLAMATH.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent, wife and two daughters, Hattie and Agnes, started from their home in Eagle Point, Wednesday, August 7th, for Klamath County. Had gone but a short distance when we overtook Lawyer Phipps and Dave Phipps, of Medford, headed for the mountains for a hunt. As we started with the calculation of only touching the high places we passed on and soon overtook three more wagons. I recognized some of them as the Jeff Grigsby family, and later on we passed Mr. Cranson and family on their way to Klamath County. In the afternoon we camped for lunch at the Big Butte bridge, a new structure that Mr. Hartman had just put up and one that reflects credit on the builders. Along here we met several loads of lumber on the way out to the valley. Passing on, the first place of note was T. B. Higinbotham's ranch and blacksmith shop, where everything looked as though prosperity had struck them hard, and as we journeyed on we passed by several fine farms and soon reached the top of the grade on the north side of Rogue River at 6:45 p.m., and camped for the night. The next morning we traveled through some fine farms, but most of them had changed so since I last passed over the road, twenty-five years ago, that it was hard for me to locate the old ones, several farms having been located since then. The old Akins sawmill at Prospect shows the effects of the actions of the elements there, that the business done now is less than in years gone by. After leaving Prospect we entered one of the finest bodies of timber in the county, where one sees yellow and sugar pine, fir and yew timber of the finest quality, some of the trees reaching one hundred feet without a limb. At Union Creek we found hay at one cent a pound and here we replenished our stock and went five miles further to Silver Camp for dinner. At this place we met two families from Fresno County, California. They were out looking at the country and had traveled up the coast to Crescent City, thence to Jackson County and were on their way to look over Eastern Oregon. After talking with them for a while one of them remarked that Douglas County was the best advertised of any county in the state, except the Willamette Valley, and that was what they had to go by, but after I left him one of the men remarked to the other, so that my wife heard him, that he had a great notion to go home and move to Jackson County this fall. They appeared to be men of means and are looking for a healthy country and I recommended the Rogue River Valley. Passing on from Silver Camp we met with nothing of interest until we reached Castle Court. Here along the banks of the Rogue River are tall pyramids of sandstone that have stood for ages, but I can see that there is quite a change in the last twenty-five years. That night we camped at the foot of the mountain on the way to Crater Lake. Here we met G. L. Davis and family, and Joseph Davis and family, and Joseph Thomas and wife, they having been to the lake the day before and were returning home. The next morning we ascended the hill to the lake, but I will not attempt a description of the grand scenery as that has been done so often. Remaining there just long enough to take in the sights, we crossed the summit of the mountain and started down the Annie Creek road, and here I will express my surprise that there has been so little said about the grand scenery along the Annie Creek Canyon. Shortly after the stream bursts from its hiding place under the mountain, it enters a deep canyon that it follows for several miles, and along which there is some of the finest sights on the whole route. As we entered the Wood River Valley we noticed a change in twenty-five years; then a vast prairie, now cut up into farms, and many of them have large groves of timber growing on them. Some have been planted, while others have simply grown without any assistance. The stockmen are all busy putting up hay, there being very little farming done here. It is estimated that there will be between seven and eight thousand tons of hay cut this year.
Medford Mail, August 23, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    John Barneburg, of Medford, was in this vicinity last Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Randall, of South Butte, were in town Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Terrilll visited relatives at Talent Saturday and Sunday.
    Several of our citizens attended the McNeal sale of horses at Eagle Point Monday.
    Jas. Stewart, of Medford, returned home Wednesday after spending several days with relatives here and at Lake Creek.
    Miss Donna Bell left for the vicinity of Woodville, where she commenced teaching school on Monday last.
    J. N. Hockersmith and family of Griffin Creek, accompanied by Mrs. Elizabeth Stewart, of Medford, visited relatives here a few days since.
Medford Mail, August 30, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Rev. Wilson, of Talent, preached here last Sunday.
    Mrs. Oglesby and daughter are visiting at O. P. McGee's.
    Mrs. Clara Rader is quite seriously ill, we are sorry to report.
    The little people had a birthday party last Sunday at the home of Mr. Jacks.
    Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lewis were visiting Mrs. L's father, Mr. Nunan, last Sunday.
    Mr. Jack, who purchased the Parliament place, is making some improvements on the residence.
    Marion Stewart, the real estate man of Medford and Mr. Thornbrook were in this section last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown and Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Nichols returned last Wednesday from an outing up on Willow Creek.
    A. L. Haselton has quite a lot of lumber on hand to make more flume as he expects to enlarge his acreage for onions and berries.
    Miss Mae Millsap, of Ashland, is the guest of Miss Tavia Howlett. They will commence teaching school in the Applegate district Monday, Sept. 2nd.
    Mrs. W. W. Miller and son, of Ashland, came up last Saturday and will visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Lewis, and her sister, Mrs. J. J. Fryer.
    Ira Tungate, of Mt. Pitt precinct, came down last Saturday. He was accompanied by his mother, who will visit for awhile here with her daughter, Mrs. E. Pool.
    H. F. Michell, of Evans Creek, was a visitor at S. F. Robinett's last Saturday night. Mr. Mitchell came up to take his son, Fred, home with him, as he was reported on the sick list.
    Jas. Lewis and family, of Sterling, visited relatives here last Sunday. He reports that the mines are still shut down there at present and consequently there is but little doing in that section.
    Last Sunday was the occasion of merrymaking in the Geo. Brown home, as most all of the children were home on a visit. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Van Scoy were up from Montague, Calif., and Mesdames Holmes and Carlton, of Central Point, were up for a visit.
    While O. P. McGee and boys were putting up hay in the Mt. Pitt district, they, in company with Boyd Potter and Cephas Moomaw, ascended to the top of Mt. Pitt. They report quite a difficult journey on their way up, but as the weather was fine and the sky clear, they had a grand view of the surrounding country.
    Last Wednesday I took a trip to the Fish Lake Ditch, and from all appearances the ditch will surely go through. On my return home I stopped at Brownsboro and had quite a pleasant chat with Brownsboro's prospective merchant, Geo. Brown. George is an excellent young man of good business qualifications and we predict success for him.
    Last Thursday Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Larimore, cousins of O. P. McGee, and Charles and Mattie McGee, all of Josephine County, came up for a visit with the McGee family. Mr. Howlett and family were invited in that evening and were treated to some fine singing. The following evening the same party were at Mr. Howlett's and spent another pleasant evening in singing and social converse.
----
JOTTINGS ON THE WAY TO FORT KLAMATH.
    The haying season will probably continue until the first of next month, although the hay crop is not so good as usual in the Fort Klamath country. While there we found quite a number of our old acquaintances, and of course spoke a good word for the Mail. Mrs. T. A. Culbertson, one of our old neighbors, formerly Miss Mary Wiley, as soon as approached on the subject of subscribing for the Mail, ordered it at once as she felt lost without the news from Southern Oregon. She and her husband have been in this section of the country for two years and now have 500 acres of land and this summer are milking twenty-five cows for the creamery. During our stay there John Cox, formerly of Medford, sold 400 head of cattle for $9000 and rented his ranch for $1000 a year. The Hoyts are putting up hay for the ranchers on contract. Levi Murphy and family were putting up Mr. Fordyce's hay, and everybody seemed to be happy and prospering. Rev. Fysh is preaching at the Fort and is well liked and is doing well. Thursday morning, the 15th, we bade farewell to our daughter and friends and started on our return trip. On the way we met a number on their way to Crater Lake and after passing the road leading to Huckleberry Mountain we passed a host of people en route thither. Many of them were strangers, but most of them were from the valley, among whom were D. T. Lawton, daughter and nephew, of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Reames, Mr. Cronemiller, Dr. Reuter, Mr. and Mrs. Crook and others from Jacksonville on their way to the lake and Pelican Bay. George Jackson and a family from California were taking in the sights of Southern Oregon. We also met Mr. Damon and family, Messrs. H. C. Turpin, A. Wyland and one of his son-in-laws on their way to the huckleberry patch. There was nothing of interest occurred the rest of the way, and we reached home at 5 o'clock the second day from the Fort.
Medford Mail, August 30, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    The Eagle Point school will commence next Monday, September 9.
    Last week Mrs. A. McNeil had a public sale of horses. They sold at good prices.
    Miss Tavia Howlett went over to Sterling last Saturday to visit her sister, Mrs. J. M. Lewis.
    Charles Wright and son, of Ashland, were in this section of the country last week upon business.
    Mrs. Frank Tungate, of Mt. Pitt, who has been visiting her children here, returned home last Sunday.
    Allen Strickland and family were in from Table Rock last Saturday to visit his mother, Mrs. H. T. Severance.
    Holmes Bros. are running their mill to its utmost capacity night and day, and still cannot supply the demand.
    Miss Ollie Tungate went to Medford last Saturday and made arrangements to attend the Medford Academy this fall.
    Mrs. S. M. Wilkinson, of Jacksonville, is visiting old friends in this section. She was the guest of N. A. Young and family last week.
    Mrs. Emma Baker and her cousin, Mrs. Foley, of Tolo, were the guests of the former's sister, Mrs. E. Pool, last week. Mrs. Foley returned to her home Saturday.
    Merchant A. J. Daley made a business trip to Jacksonville last week. On his way home he stopped in Medford and purchased a new supply of goods from the merchants there.
    A family by the name of Martin has moved into the A. J. Daley house. This leaves but three vacant houses in town, and they all will soon be filled by families who are anxious to take advantage of our school facilities.
    Messrs. Bradshaw and Stevens have been in this section with their threshing machine. Those who were fortunate enough to have their threshing done before it rained are rejoicing, as the rain will stop work for a few days.
    Mrs. D. H. S. Pearce and son, of Forest Creek, were the guests of Mrs. A. M. Thomas one night last week. They were on their way to Huckleberry Mountain, when the young man was taken sick and they had to stop over for a day or two.
    It was announced last week that Miss Mae Millsap would commence her school in the Antelope district on Monday of this week, but later the directors decided to have her postpone it for a week, so school will begin on Monday, September 9.
    J. M. Simmons, of St. Louis, has just come out from Mt. Pitt precinct and reports that there are several persons in that section, from California, who are killing deer by the wholesale and drying the meat, intending to take it to California to sell. He suggests that the authorities ought to look after them.
    Last week I took a trip to Ashland via the the hill road, and was surprised to see so much building going on all along the route. Every indication is that the development of Southern Oregon has just commenced and that in the near future industries will be introduced which will entirely revolutionize the old systems.
    In my last by some means the name of Miss E. O. Haynes, of Grants Pass, who was a guest of Mr. and Mrs. O. P. McGee, and whose name should have appeared in the list of singers, was omitted. She is a daughter of Rev. Haynes of the M.E. Church South, and is one of the finest musicians in Southern Oregon.
    The Eagle Point Hotel changed hands last Monday morning. Mr. and Mrs. A. Pool, who have conducted the hotel for over seventeen years, are retiring and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Thomas [are] taking charge of the business. Mr. and Mrs. Pool will move to their farm on the edge of the desert, where they will reside permanently. They expect to derive great benefit from the Fish Lake Ditch, which is surveyed along the hillside on their place for a mile. We bespeak for the new proprietors of the hotel a liberal patronage.
Medford Mail, September 6, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Born--On July 30, 1901, to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Winkle, a son.
    Geo. Brown has completed his store building and is preparing to open up for business soon.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Klingle, of Lake Creek, are the proud parents of a son born August 31, 1901.
    Messrs. Bradshaw and Stevens are doing good work with their threshing machine this season.
    Miss Lottie Taylor, of Eagle Point, has been visiting with Misses Nora and Edna Charley the last few days.
    Mr. Maxcy, of Medford, made a trip to Big Butte recently to look after the improving of his homestead which he has lately taken.
    Iva May Wright, of Lake Creek, died August 13, 1901, after a short illness, aged eleven years, four months and eleven days. Iva was a bright, intelligent little girl whom everybody loved. A mother, sister and two brothers mourn her loss. Interment was held in the Brownsboro cemetery, her little friends covering her grave with flowers. The deepest sympathy is felt for the bereaved relatives by their many friends.
Asleep in Jesus, blessed sleep;
    Too much for me do not weep;
We'll meet again, oh, Mother, dear,
    In that home of heavenly cheer.
Medford Mail, September 6, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Geo. Brown & Sons are putting a new front onto their store.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover have gone to the huckleberry patch.
    John Fisher and family have moved into the Fryer house on the north side of Butte Creek.
    Wm. Betz and family and Lee Black and sister, Martha, came in from Klamath County last week.
    Mr. Peyton, formerly postmaster at Peyton, left last week for California. Mrs. Peyton was installed as postmaster of that place.
    One day last week Mrs. H. T. Severance went to shake a yellow jacket off her hand and in doing so threw one of her fingers out of place.
    Messrs Letcher and Morton took a trip to the Big Butte country for a hunt last week but met with little success, as there was too much foliage on the underbrush.
    Rev. Fysh and family, of Ft. Klamath, came over last week and were given a cordial greeting by their many old friends. Mr. Fysh preached for us on Sunday.
    Jos. Martin, the gentleman who recently moved into the Daley house, was made happy Sept. 8th, upon the arrival of a new baby boy. They are now readers of the Mail.
    Mr. Knighten and family, who have been stopping in Central Point for some time in order to give their son medical treatment, are in our midst again and are camped in Mrs. Thomas' yard.
    The Meeker brothers, formerly of Big Butte, now of Colorado, sons of A. J. Meeker, of Big Butte, spent last Monday night here, and on Tuesday, in company with their father, went to his home on Big Butte.
    Foster & Hays gave a dance last Friday night at this place, which was not as largely attended as was hoped for. Mrs. C. Thomas gave the supper, and it is reported to be one of the most elaborate spreads ever given in Eagle Point.
    Our school commenced last Monday with Prof. Bish as principal and Miss Clara Richardson in charge of the primary department. We have every indication of having a good school this winter, as both of the teachers come well recommended.
    Last Sunday while little Austin Green was driving his grandfather's team, one of the tugs came unfastened, letting the tongue to the ground and in so doing broke the tongue and reach and throwing the little boy out of the wagon and the seat falling on top of him. Fortunately he was not hurt, but the broken end of the tongue ran into one of the horses' feet and hurt it quite badly.
    Last week my daughter, Agnes, and myself took a trip to the Big Butte country, spending the night with Wm Chambers, Jr., and his estimable family. They are readers of 
the Mail and are well pleased with it. While on the way up we met teams loaded with lumber, shakes and posts in great quantities, which would indicate that these are prosperous times in Jackson County.
    Jas. Ringer, one of the leading painters of Jackson County, who has been in Central Point for some time doing painting and paper hanging, was in our midst last week looking after his interests in this section. While here he took several orders for paper and subscribed for 
the Mail so that he could keep posted on this part of the country and send it as a letter every week to his children in Ohio.
    Our little town was quite lively last week on account of so much hauling being done, and our streets gave the appearance of a city. At one time there were so many teams congregated that the travel was completely blocked and some of the teams from the mountains had to wait some time before they could pass.
    Died--Aug. 9, 1901, of heart disease, at Seattle, Wash., A. V. Barnum, formerly of this place, aged about fifty-eight years. Mr. Barnum left this section of the country for the gold fields of Alaska, but not succeeding in that undertaking he returned to Washington, where he intended going into the restaurant business, but was suddenly called away, dying as he was walking the street with a friend.
Medford Mail, September 13, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    C. E. Terrell is moving his hay to town where he is storing it for sale during the winter.
    Delbert Terrilll drove a fine band of cattle through town Wednesday on his way to the valley.
    J. C. Geer is running an express wagon between the Fish Lake ditch camp and Medford.
    Wm. Martin, of Lake Creek, returned home a few days since, after spending the summer east of the mountains.
    Miss Edith Cox, of Big Butte, accompanied her brother to Central Point Monday, where she is spending several days with her sister, Mrs. C. C. Prall.
    Our town is busy with the motion and commotion of wagons--men with their families jostling on towards the ditch line, parties going to or from the various places of resort; besides our own people hauling and delivering their produce or taking it on to a further market. 
Medford Mail, September 13, 1901, page 3



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mr. and Mrs. Paul Van Scoy went to Medford last week for a visit with relatives, after which they returned to their home at Montague, Calif.
    Holmes Bros. are doing a rushing business at their Snowy Butte mill this fall. They are sending large quantities of mill stuff to Josephine County.
    Our town is being decorated with new business signs, A. J. Florey, our grocer and postmaster, having a new one, as also John Williscroft, the druggist.
    Bradshaw & Stevens brought in their thresher last week, having finished work in the Table Rock section. They have had a fairly good run this season.
    A family named Peachey, from Oklahoma, is camped here. They are looking for a home where they can educate their children and will probably locate in some town in the valley.
    Rev. R. Fysh left last Wednesday for his home in Klamath County, loaded with supplies for himself and neighbors. He may return later and take a load of fruit to Lake County.
    About twenty little folks gave Roy McGee a surprise party last Friday night, taking refreshments with them. They played until ten o'clock, when they returned to their homes, having enjoyed the evening very much.
    Chris Cawley and family and the Misses Newton, of Klamath County, and Miss Icy March, of Coquille City, were the guests of Mrs. A. M. Thomas last week. Miss March has gone to Medford to attend the academy.
    Wm. Smith, living on Rogue River, had the misfortune to fall about twenty feet last week. Several ribs were broken by his fall and he was otherwise badly hurt. At last accounts he was in a precarious condition and fears were entertained that he could not recover. 
    A Mr. Henderson and family stopped one night last week with Rev. J. P. Moomaw. They left Talent a few years ago for Arkansas, but that country did not suit them. They then tried Missouri, Kansas and Idaho, and have finally returned to Jackson County, where they will probably remain.
    A. M. DeCarlow, accompanied by Miss Ardella Oden, stopped in town last week while on his way to Medford. Mr. DeCarlow is one of Elk Creek's prosperous farmers and stockraisers, and Miss Oden has been teaching school in that district. They report that there is considerable activity in that section. Quite a number of new buildings are going up and arrangements are being made to have the school house moved to the mouth of the creek, near the fish hatchery.
Medford Mail, September 20, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    G. L. Davis was interviewing our merchants one day last week.
    Mrs. E. Simon came up from Tolo last week on a business trip.
    Miss Elsie Nye left last week for a visit with relatives near Roseburg.
    Deputy Sheriff Thompson was out visiting John Williscroft one day last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Daley came down from their sawmill on Round Top last Saturday.
    The stock men in this section are gathering their beef cattle and getting ready for the fall shipments.
    Rev. Eby came out last Sunday and gave the Sunday school a short talk. He returned home the same day.
    A. J. Daley made a business trip to Medford last week, where he procured goods to replenish his stock until his goods arrived from the East.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover returned from the huckleberry patch last week and report having gathered about twenty-five gallons of berries.
    Jos. Martin's little boy was taken quite sick last Friday night and A. J. Daley, the magnetic healer, was called in and relieved him in a few minutes.
    Jos. Martin and Scott Pool came down from the big ditch last Saturday. They report that hands are so scarce that they have not enough to run the teams.
    A. J. Daley & Son call the attention of the readers of 
the Mail to the fact that they have a sawmill and planer for sale. See local elsewhere in this paper.
    Holmes Bros., of Snowy Butte mills, have been putting in a new dam. They are receiving large quantities of wheat, notwithstanding the cry of short crops.
    Vast quantities of lumber are being hauled through here daily. One day last week there were ten loads passed through here, and some of the teams had two wagons attached.
    We are informed that every house in Eagle Point except one is engaged for the winter by families who are desirous of taking advantage of our surroundings and good school.
    Mr. Knighten, who has been camped in Mrs. Thomas' yard for some time, is making arrangements to move into the house formerly occupied by A. C. Howlett on the W. B. Dailey place.
    I understand that the services of Miss Euola Haynes have been secured to teach a class in music here this winter. She comes well recommended as a music teacher and a large class is assured.
    Our citizens turned out en masse last Thursday and attended memorial services. Rev. J. P. Moomaw conducted the services and made some very appropriate remarks, after which he requested the audience to sing the President's favorite hymn, "Nearer My God to Thee." At the close of the hymn A. C. Howlett made a few remarks. The entire community feel that they have met with a severe loss and the general sentiment seems to be that Congress must enact some law to put a stop to the anarchist element of the foreign countries being forced upon us.
Medford Mail, September 27, 1901, page 5



Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    Blakely and Miranda, of Multnomah County, came into this vicinity a few days since.
    Mrs. H. A. Meyers, accompanied by Mrs. August Meyers, called on friends in town while going to the valley last week.
    Mr. Hosmer, of South Butte, was in town Wednesday. He is hauling material to build a new dwelling house in the near future.
    Mr. Turner, who has spent the summer working on the ditch, returned with his family to their home near Medford this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nichols called in town Tuesday, while on their return trip from Big Butte, where they had spent several days visiting with relatives.
    L. C. Charley and family have moved to Mrs. M. M. Brown's place, Mrs. Brown having moved down to town. Mr. and Mrs. Charley sold their home place to Jno. Cook, of the Willamette Valley. They intend to improve, and build, on another section of their farm next spring.
Medford Mail, September 27, 1901, page 3



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mr. and Mrs. John Rader have moved into their new house.
    Rev. J. P. Moomaw made a business trip to the county seat last week.
    W. O. Fox and family, of Ashland, were visiting Mr. and Mrs. Thos. E. Nichols last week.
    James Cline and family have moved to Snow, where he expects to work in the lumber business.
    Mrs. Emma Baker and Misses Julia Ayres and Ollie Tungate, of Mt. Pitt, were visiting Mrs. E. Pool last week.
    The Peachey families have moved into the Coy house in town. By next week every available house in town will be occupied.
    Mrs. A. L. Haselton gave a party to several of the schoolmates of her son, Frank, last Sunday, it being his eighth birthday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Henderson are the happy parents of a new baby which came to their home, near Eagle Point, last week.
    Some of our farmers have commenced to sow wheat, while others are plowing the ground and getting ready to sow later in the season.
    Jeff Grigsby, the Agate postmaster, has built a new house to be used as a residence and also as a store in connection with the post office.
    Mrs. Kelso, accompanied by her daughter, Miss Alta Wood, came up last Friday to visit her daughter, Mrs. Cline, before she left for her new home at Snow.
    Our school is gradually filling up. Children are coming from adjoining districts, and families are moving into town to take advantage of the good school facilities.
    Mr. DeCarlow and Miss Oden passed through here last Saturday on their way to Medford. Miss Oden will go from there to Klamath County, where her parents reside.
    Born--On September 13, 1901, to Mr. and Mrs. Les Shaw, of Clackamas County, a daughter. Mrs. Shaw was formerly Miss Nettie Cooke, a niece of Mrs. Howlett, and lived here two years ago.
    Nick Young, Jr., came very near being seriously injured one day last week. He was riding on some dump boards when the horses became frightened and commenced to run, throwing him off. He was quite badly hurt, but at last account he was doing well.
    J. N. Archibald, of Portland, stopped here Sunday night on his way from Lakeview to Medford. He reported about four inches of snow on the summit at the head of Rogue River. He said it was snowing at Lakeview when he left there on the 22nd, and that some of the stockmen had fifteen days' haying yet to do this fall.
Medford Mail, October 4, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. J. N. Nichols and her daughter, Miss Dollie, were the guests of Mrs. Howlett last Sunday.
    Ira Tungate, of Mt. Pitt precinct, made a business trip to Medford and Jacksonville last Saturday.
    Miss Tavia Howlett left last Wednesday morning on the excursion for Portland, to remain indefinitely.
    Two families by the name of Clark and Beck have moved in the Riddle house to take advantage of our school facilities.
    A. J. Daley has been getting the rock out for the foundation of his new store and expects to have the carpenters at work on it soon.
    There is some talk of giving an entertainment here in the near future for the purpose of getting a new organ for the Sunday school.
    J. Hartman and Mr. Robbins will soon commence reroofing the grist mill and putting up porches to protect the wagons from the rain while loading and unloading.
    John Smith, who has been working for Joseph Rader for about two years, went to Portland on the excursion and from there he will go to Hood River, where he will work for a railroad company.
    According to the latest census report, there are twenty-five school children in the Sunnyside part of the town, and one of our teachers is talking of requiring more seats and desks in her department.
    Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Hoyt, A. Hoyt and Mrs. Hoyt's two sisters, the Misses Ingle, came over from Ft. Klamath last week. One of the young ladies will attend St. Mary's Academy in Jacksonville, and the other will remain in the valley during the winter.
    A mining man by the name of Chamberlain, accompanied by his wife, were in this neighborhood last Friday night on his way to the Fish Lake Ditch. He is around looking at the various mines in our county and regrets that the water is so scarce in the mining regions that they cannot be worked to a better advantage.
    Miss E. Haynes, accompanied by Miss Laura and Chas. McGee and Mr. Green, came up from Grants Pass last week. The latter two have gone to the hills for a hunt. Miss Haynes will organize a class in music and commence teaching at once. The prospects are that she will have a large class, as she comes highly recommended.
    Last Sunday was the day for the election of officers in the Sunday school, and all the old officers were reelected with the exception of the Bible class teacher and the organist. A. C. Howlett was elected as teacher of the Bible class and Miss Haynes as organist. At the close of the regular work the superintendent announced that next Sunday at 10 o'clock Misses Haynes and Richardson would sing a duet, and the following Sunday there would be one by Mr. R. G. Brown and someone whom she may select.
Medford Mail, October 11, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Born--On October 11, 1901, to Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey, a son.
    Mrs. Mike Hanley was a pleasant caller on Mrs. Howlett on Tuesday of last week.
    Mrs. Beck, who recently moved into the Riddle house, has moved from there to Brownsboro.
    Benj. Fredenburg stopped here Sunday night, on his way to Medford with a load of shakes.
    Henry Taylor, one of the enterprising farmers of Eden precinct, was over to our mill last week after his winter supplies.
    A. J. Daley has a force of men at work pushing to complete his new store building, getting it ready for his fall and winter stock of goods.
    Nelson Nye and his mother-in-law, Mrs. Green, and Mr. Phipps, of Flounce Rock precinct, came out last Saturday and were the guests of A. J. Florey.
    Married--On October 6th, at the residence of the bride's parents on Upper Little Butte, Henry Wahlers and Miss Emma Tonn, Rev. J. P. Moomaw officiating.
    Our citizens were treated to a negro minstrel show one night last week. They had a good-sized audience and those who were present report a good entertainment.
    A. Betz called on your correspondent last week. He reported that J. J. Howser, of Medford, had just completed a new barn for him. The building is 40x48 feet in size.
    J. R. Neil, of Jacksonville, and his nephew, Fred R. Neil, of Ashland, were the guests of O. P. McGee last Sunday night. They were on their way to the Elk Creek country on a hunting trip.
    Mr. Brown and family, who have been living on the Phipps place, north of town, for several years, moved to California last week. Mr. Ashpole has moved onto the place vacated by Mr. Brown.
    Surveyor J. S. Howard and G. T. Jones, the county surveyor, were in Eagle Point one day last week. They had been doing some work on Rogue River and showing eastern capitalists some of the fine timber in that section.
    John Hart and Mrs. Susan C. Woods were married at Jacksonville on October 5, 1901, by Judge Chas. Prim. The newly married couple left the same day on a trip to Astoria, returning home last Saturday.
    Dr. W. B. Officer and his cousin, Frank Taylor, arrived here last week from Grass Valley, Calif. Dr. Officer has rented the Ashpole house and will remain here for some time, while Mr. Taylor is on his way to Montana.
    A family by the name of Lanigan has moved into the Joe Wilson house, thus adding more children to our school. Prof. Bish told me a few days ago that there was room for four more pupils in each department and then all the seats would be full.
Medford Mail, October 18, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA
.
    F. M. Stewart, of Medford, was in town and vicinity a few days since.
    C. C. Pletcher, of Medford, spent Saturday night in town while on his way to Big Butte.
    Miss Sophia Ratrie went to Medford Monday, where she will attend the academy during the winter.
    C. A. Elder and his brother Henry returned last week from near Bly, Klamath County, where they had spent the summer.
    Frank Graham came home a few days since from Fort Klamath vicinity, where he was working through the summer season.
    J. K. Tyrrell, who has been teaching a successful term of school at South Butte, went down Tuesday to attend the teachers institute at Ashland.
    M. L. Pelling's apple pickers and packers, about thirty-six in number, came over last week to take charge of the fruit of the orchard purchased some weeks ago from C. E. Terrilll.
    Our Sunday school was made very pleasant last Sunday evening by a party of young people from the Eagle Point Sunday school. These friendly visits exchanged help to create a lively interest in the Sabbath schools.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Culbertson, of Lake Creek, made a trip to Medford Monday. Mrs. Elizabeth Culbertson, just from Fort Klamath, came back with them. She will spend the winter with her daughter and son, Mrs. J. K. Bell and J. D. Culbertson.
    The wedding of Gus Wahlers, of Wellen, and Miss Emma Tonn, of South Butte, took place at the home of the bride's parents, Sunday, the 6th. Rev. J. P. Moomaw performed the ceremony. The best wishes of the community are extended the happy couple.
Medford Mail, October 18, 1901, page 3



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Roy Surran, of Medford, was a guest at O. P. McGee's last Sunday.
    Miss Haynes has her class in music organized and is progressing nicely.
    George Brown & Sons have completed the front on their store house and put up a neat porch on the east side of the building.
    A. M. Clark, manager of one of the road graders on the big ditch, was down Sunday and reports work in progress as well as could be expected.
    Misses Lizzie and Gertrude Richardson, of Beagle, were visiting their sister, Miss Clara Richardson, our primary teacher, last Sunday at O. P. McGee's.
    Jas. Ringer and D. C. Tryer, the painters and paper hangers, came out from Central Point last Sunday. They expect to do some work here soon for O. P. McGee and A. L. Haselton.
    Benton Pool, who has been working on A. J. Daley's store building, left this week for Klamath County, in company with Jason Hartman, where they expect to put up several new barns.
    Eli Ellis, of Ashland, has purchased the property known as the Mike Freeman place here, of J. J. Fryer, consideration $150. Mr. Ellis has been fitting up the house for a temporary residence. He contemplates bringing water from the creek onto the land the coming year.
    Last week your correspondent took a trip to Wm. Daley's place, on the north fork of Little Butte, where he saw everything in the vegetable line and all kinds of fruit growing in abundance. Mr. Daley reports having gathered about 18,000 pounds of potatoes off of about a half an acre of ground, and they are all nice, large potatoes. His son, Ervin, will market about 30,000 pound of onions this season off of a small tract of land.
    Prof. A. L. Haselton is getting out the lumber for flumes and contemplates building a large vegetable house so that he can put his onions away in spite of the rain. This year he has already sold 80,000 pounds of onions and is now preparing the ground so that he can put out a larger area next year. The way the onion industry is progressing in this section, Butte Creek will soon be as noted for onions as the country around Medford is for fruit.
Medford Mail, October 25, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    J. J. Fryer has lumber on the ground for a new fence on his land in Eagle Point.
    Miss Edna Charley, of Brownsboro, was the guest of Mrs. S. H. Holmes last week.
    Mrs. D. E. Morris was in our town last Sunday combining business with pleasure.
    W. G. Kropke, deputy game warden, was here the first of the week upon business.
    Dr. Pletcher will be at Gold Hill Nov. 10th, 11th and 12th and at Woodville Nov. 13th and 14th.
    Mr. Peachey and S. F. Robinett left Monday for the Big Butte country on a hunting trip.
    Mrs. Rose Potter this week calls attention to her stock of winter hats and Racine hosiery.
    H. B. Nye and Miss Lillie Gregory, of Medford, were visiting in Eagle Point last Sunday.
    James Ringer, the painter and paper hanger, commenced work on the McGee house last Monday.
    Mr. Fredenburg has moved into the Pelling house for the purpose of sending his children to school.
    Last Sunday James Owens run down and killed with a club a coyote, on the desert south of Eagle Point.
    A. Pool, who is now living on his farm on the desert, was smiling on his friends in Eagle Point last Sunday.
   Chas. Knighten, of Prospect, was out a few days ago trying to buy cattle and attending to business in Medford.
    A. J. Daley calls the attention of the readers of 
the Mail this week to the fact that he has a span of large work horses for sale.
    Mrs. W. R. Potter gave a social party to her friends on Wednesday evening of last week. Those who were present report having had a very pleasant time.
    Last Saturday night Mrs. Scott Pool gave a candy pulling party to some of the little folks. Quite a number of the older ones also attended, and all had a good time.
    John Ashpole has move his household goods to the Reese farm, where he is now living. Dr. W. B. Officer will move into the house vacated by Mr. Ashpole as soon as his furniture arrives.
    Since there is a prospect of a ditch being taken out of Little Butte Creek so that we can irrigate our land, Eagle Point is taking quite a boom. Several parties have been here recently trying to purchase property.
    Eli Ellis, who purchased the Mike Forman property from J. J. Fryer recently, has been at work putting in new doors and windows and is now fencing the land. He has already been offered a good sum for his bargain.
    By some means the reporter of the proceedings of the institute at Ashland omitted the names of Miss Clara Richardson, teacher of our primary department, and her sister, Miss Gertrude, who is teaching at Beagle. They are wide-awake teachers and are highly esteemed by the patrons of the schools.
    The fruit industry is causing the land owners to realize the value of their land, and there is a prospect of several hundred acres of land in this section of the county being set to fruit trees. The general impression is that within a few years Jackson County will produce as much fruit and of as good quality as any section of like size on the Pacific Slope.
Medford Mail, November 1, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Ira Tungate came out from Mt. Pitt precinct Saturday. He will attend the Medford Academy.
    Alfred Letcher, our jeweler, has ordered quite a number of organs for different families in this section of the country.
    Dr. W. B. Officer moved his furniture into the Ashpole house last Saturday and will commence housekeeping soon.
    O. P. McGee has gone to look after his interests in the Rancheria country. His absence is greatly felt in our Sunday school.
    A large amount of lumber is being hauled to town, and the prospects are that a good many improvements will be made here this winter.
   A. J. Daley has introduced water paint and is applying it to the outside of his new store building, although he thinks he will have Mr. Ringer use oil paint on the inside work.
    James Ringer, our painter and paper hanger, has about all the work in his line that he can do. He expects his partner, Mr. Tryer, out this week to join him in his work.
    Eli Ellis and son are at work surveying a line for a ditch from John Daley's flume. They expect to push the work to completion as possible, so that South Eagle Point can have the benefit of the water.
    The first of last week Mr. Boyden and County Surveyor Jones stopped overnight at the Sunnyside Hotel, of which Mrs. Howlett is proprietor. They were on their way to the upper Rogue River country on a hunting trip.
    Mrs. Joseph Martin is in a very critical condition and but little hope is entertained for her recovery, as her tongue is so paralyzed that she is unable to swallow anything. The neighbors are doing all they can to assist the family.
    Last Sunday I took a trip to Big Butte to procure the services of Mrs. E. M. Cox, an experienced nurse, to take care of Mrs. S. B. Holmes, who is quite ill. Mrs. Cox has decided to read 
the Mail for the next year at least.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Hoyt and George Hoyt came in from Ft. Klamath last week. George returned home by way of Medford, while Ed. took the train for California to look for a location. Mrs. Hoyt will remain with us for a while.
Medford Mail, November 8, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mr. and Mrs. Barrows, of Grants Pass, came up last week to visit Mrs. B.'s sister, Mrs. Martin, who is quite sick.
    Allen Strickland, who lives in the Table Rock country, was up last week visiting his mother, Mrs. H. T. Severance.
    Geo. Meagley and family, who have been visiting Mrs. M.'s mother, Mrs. Heckathorn, left last Monday for their home on Evans Creek.
    One day last week as Robt. Came was endeavoring to get off of his wagon, his foot slipped and he fell on his hip, laying him up for several days.
    Fred Mitchell came down from the big ditch last Sunday and reports everything progressing nicely with their work on account of the fine weather.
    A. J. Daley has had a new sign painted on one side of his new store--covering the entire length, and it reflects much credit to the painters, Messrs. Ringer and Tryer.
    A young man by the name of John Foster, who is working on the ditch, had the misfortune to hurt his leg recently and an abscess has formed. Last Sunday Dr. Officer was summoned to give the young man treatment.
    Mr. Lonigan, who is engaged in hauling mill stuff for Holmes Bros., while on the road to Central Point one day last week had the misfortune to be run into by a man with a light rig and the tongue was broken out of his wagon. The man drove on and left him as though nothing had happened, but with the assistance of a good farmer he succeeded in fixing the tongue so as to take his load on to its destination without further accident.
    Last Wednesday I made a business trip to Gold Hill and on the way saw some of the finest farms in the county. Some farmers were plowing, some putting in grain and some cutting hay. Think of that--cutting hay on the 6th of November! This was their fourth crop of alfalfa. On the way home I met W. Spence, the gentleman who purchased the old Humphrey place of C. C. Beekman. He has made so many improvements on the old place one can hardly recognize it. It now has the appearance of the home of a prosperous farmer. Upon inquiry I found that he was not only a subscriber to 
the Mail but was sending it to his friends in Eastern Oregon, and was a great admirer of the sheet. We are always glad to welcome such men to our community.
Medford Mail, November 15, 1901, page 5


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.

(Received too late for last week.)

    Farmers are very busy plowing and seeding since the late rains.
    Henry Wilson and family, of Applegate, have moved in town for the winter.
    Miss Alma Wilson, of Central Point, opened school here Oct. 18th with a good attendance.
    Messrs. Lindley and Jackson brothers, of Medford, took dinner with friends in town last Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Farlow, of South Butte, were trading in town Saturday and visiting with relatives and friends.
    Henry Hoeft, who spent the summer near Klamathon, returned Monday for a few weeks' visit with relatives and friends near Lake Creek.
    Mrs. J. A. Miller and father, T. Baldwin, have returned home from Scio, Linn County, where they have been visiting relatives for the past month.
    Dr. Officer called on friends in town Sunday evening. He was returning from a visit to Wm. Messal, of Salt Creek, who was taken suddenly ill with pneumonia.
    C. E. Terrilll has purchased half of Delbert Terrilll's home place and has moved onto the same. Delbert has moved to town for the winter for the school advantages.
    All the vacant houses in town and vicinity are being occupied by families. the menfolks are working on the ditch line and the children are attending school.
Medford Mail, November 15, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Dr. Reader, of Ashland, spent last Friday night in Eagle Point.
    Mr. and Mrs. Middlebusher took a fine lot of turkeys to Medford last week.
    Miss Doshia Martin, of Trail, was visiting friends in Eagle Point last Saturday.
    Wm. Daley, a prominent farmer of Little Butte Creek, was in Eagle Point Monday.
    Mr. Veatch, of Ashland, who bought the Reese place on Rogue River, passed through town one day last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. True, of Griffin Creek, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Severance last Saturday and Sunday.
     Mr. Peachey, accompanied by his son, Bert, went up to the Big Butte country this week to build a house on his homestead.
     Married--November 13, 1901, by Rev. J. P. Moomaw, at the residence of the bride's parents, Henry Tonn and Miss Anna Grissom.
    Married--At the residence of the officiating minister, Rev. J. P. Moomaw, on November 13, 1910, Fred Pettigrew and Mrs. Christina Ewen.
    Miss Donna Bell, who has been teaching at Woodville, passed through here Saturday on her way to Brownsboro to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Bell.
    Arrangements were made for our Sunday school to go to Brownsboro last Sunday afternoon to visit the school there, but on account of the rain the visit was postponed to some future time.
    Eli Ellis and son are pushing their ditch to completion as fast as possible. They have secured the right of way through the different tracts of land which the ditch will cross, and agree to have the water running in it by the first of June.
    County Commissioner Thomas Riley came over last Monday and made arrangements for the family of Joseph Martin to be properly cared for, as they are all sick, seven in all. The neighbors have been contributing for their comfort and sustenance for the past several weeks.
    Frank Brown, of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons, sent four onions to Illinois by Wm. Holmes, of Central Point, to let their friends there see what kind of onions they raise on Butte Creek. The four weighed nine pounds and three ounces. They were not so large as many that have been shipped from here, but they were beauties. He also sent a few boxes of our Butte Creek apples. Seeing is believing.   
    Died--At the family residence, near Prospect, November 14, 1901, Mrs. Clara Bush, wife of Harry Bush, aged 24 years, six months and three days. The remains were interred in the Talent Cemetery last Saturday, the funeral service being conducted by Rev. J. P. Moomaw, his text being II Kings XX:1. Deceased was a devoted Christian woman and exemplified a true Christian character. In early life she embraced the religion of her father, Rev. S. A. Shuck, of Merrill, Klamath County, and united with the German Baptist Church. She leaves a husband and a baby boy eleven months old, who have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.
Medford Mail, November 22, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Born--Nov. 22, 1901, to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lewis, a daughter.
    Calvin Owens, one of our hustling farmers, was in from his Big Sticky farm last Sunday.
    Wilbur Ashpole, who has been in San Francisco for medical treatment, has returned home.
    Mrs. David Ball, of Woodville, came up last week to visit her mother, Mrs. Heckathorn.
    Wm. Ulrich has been making some very substantial improvements on his place here in Eagle Point.
    Our efficient teacher, Prof. Bish, is quite ill with neuralgia and Miss Donna Bell is teaching in his place.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ora Bellows passed through here last Monday on their way to their home on Rogue River.
    Mr. Clark, boss of the rock gang on the big ditch, was down last week and reports work progressing rapidly.
    Geo. Daley and family moved from their sawmill on Round Top last week and are located in their home here.
    Major Carter and two sons, Clyde and Arthur, of Ashland, passed through here last Sunday on their way to the big ditch to work.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tungate desire to tender their thanks to many friends for kindness during the illness and death of their son, Curtis.
    Mr. Peachey and son, Bert, returned last week from Willow Prairie, where they have been fixing up a house to move into. He has rented the Stanley ranch there and will keep stock in that section.
    Holmes Bros. have put in a new flour dresser in their grist mill here. They intend to keep up their reputation of making the best flour in Southern Oregon and are keeping pace with all modern improvements.
    I had an interview with Miss Clara Richardson, our primary teacher, last week in regard to our school and she assures me that we have as good a lot of children here as can be found in the county, and as far as her department is concerned, a more promising school cannot be found. Prof. Bish reports similar conditions, and as a consequence the patrons are all well pleased and very proud of the progress made, and we have just cause to believe we have one of the best schools in the county.
    It becomes my painful duty to record two deaths in our little town last week. One of them was Valera Margaret Martin, the five-year-old child of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Martin, who died Nov. 22, 1901. Interment was made in the Central Point Cemetery, A. C. Howlett officiating at the grave. The other death was that of Curtis Tungate, of Mt. Pitt precinct, who was brought here on the 21st inst. for medical treatment and died at the home of his brother-in-law, Emanuel Pool, on the 24th, aged thirty-one years, eight months and one day. Deceased leaves a father and mother and several sisters and brothers to mourn his loss. The funeral was preached at the home of Rev. J. P. Moomaw and interment was made in the Central Point Cemetery. The remains were followed to their last resting place by a large number of sorrowing relatives and friends. Deceased was a highly respected young man and his loss will be greatly felt in the section where he lived. The sorrowing relatives have the sympathy of a host of friends in their sad bereavement.
Medford Mail, November 29, 1901, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Miss Scott, of Albany, is visiting her uncle, T. E. Nichols, and family.
    Miss Lottie Taylor was the guest of Miss Hattie Howlett last Monday.
    Mrs. C. E. Hoyt has opened a dressmaking establishment in Eagle Point.
    John Nichols, of Lake Flat, was visiting friends in this section Thanksgiving Day.
    Mrs. McDonald, of Brownsboro, is acting in the capacity of nurse in the family of Joseph Martin.
    W. R. Potter spent several days at Ashland last week visiting his mother, who is ill, and other relatives.
    Messrs. Ringer and Ellis were engaged last week in putting a new roof on a part of A. C. Howlett's residence.
    Holmes Bros. have been cleaning up and repairing their mill, getting everything to readiness for their winter's run.
    Quite a number of our pleasure-seekers went to Medford last Saturday evening to attend the athletic entertainment.
    A. J. Daley has moved his stock of goods from his old store room into his new building. He seems to be doing a good business.
    Irvin Daley has rented the McNeil place and will move onto it soon. He expects to turn his attention to the production of onions and other vegetables.
    Ira Tungate came out from Mt. Pitt Precinct last week with a load of hogs for T. E. Pottenger, of Medford. He returned home Sunday, accompanied by his mother.
    George W. Daley, Sr. is erecting a woodshed on his place in Eagle Point so as to cover his wood and also the well, thereby adding much to the convenience of the place.
    Miss Clara Richardson, our primary teacher, spent Thanksgiving with her parents at Beagle. She returned to Eagle Point Sunday afternoon, accompanied by her brother.
    Hon. Wm. Colvig, of Jacksonville, who was booked for a speech last Thursday evening, in the interest of the A.O.U.W., failed to be present, but Alfred Letcher, our jeweler, filled the place with credit to himself and profit to his hearers.
    Thanksgiving Day passed off very quietly with us. At night Messrs. Thomas and Brown gave a dance, which was well attended, sixty-three numbers being sold. It was estimated that between 150 and 200 people took supper. There was the very best order and everything passed off pleasantly.
Medford Mail, December 6, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Rev. and Mrs. Moomaw went to Talent last Friday, returning Sunday.
    Frank Lewis took his sister-in-law, Mrs. David Ball, to her home, near Woodville, last week.
    Several of the friends of Mrs. A. M. Thomas met at her house last Saturday night and report having had a very enjoyable time.
    Miss Clara Richardson was unable to teach for a few days last week on account of sickness, and Miss Donna Bell filled her place.
    There is a movement on foot to have a box social during the holidays for the benefit of the suspension footbridge here, which is very much in need of repair.
    Quite a number of our citizens met at the Dunkard Church last week and made arrangements to celebrate the coming Christmas festivities in the usual way.
    There is considerable talk of real estate in this section changing hands. Strangers pass through here every week inquiring the price and character of land, and several offers have been made on different places.
    Jas. Ringer, our painter and paper hanger, left Saturday for Central Point, where he has rented a house and expects to meet his children this week. He could not secure a house here, so was compelled to seek one elsewhere, but will return as soon as one can be obtained. He is talking of buying property here.
    Miss Mattie Taylor came near meeting with a serious accident one day last week while out horseback riding. Her horse became frightened and threw her off in a deep mud hole and then started for home. She was considerably bruised and shaken, as well as thoroughly drenched with mud and water, but fortunately no serious damage was done.
    A proposition has been made by J. Frank Brown to erect a town hall to be used for all social and religious purposes, free of cost. He says this can be done if the citizens will give a bonus of $200, and the indications are that it will be raised, as the people are all very anxious to secure a place where we can meet without the constant dread of a fate like the Silver Lake holocaust.
    Last Friday morning the residence of Mr. Jack was burned to the ground. The family were all absent from home except Mr. and Mrs. Jack and the fire had such a headway when it was discovered that they could do nothing. Everything was lost, including $100 in money, except a few pieces of furniture, three bicycles and some dishes. A subscription paper was circulated and $15 in cash raised in a few minutes. A part of the money, which was gold, was found but in a melted condition and can be recoined. The fire is supposed to have caught from a coal of fire being dropped on the floor when a fire was built in the heater. These good people have the sympathy of the entire neighborhood, as they are an aged couple and have quite a family to support.
EAGLE POINT SCHOOL REPORT.
    Following is the school report of Eagle Point school, for term ending Nov. 29, 1901:
    Number of days taught, 54; days attendance, 2836; days absent, 364; cases of tardiness, 113; number of boys enrolled, 36; girls 39; total, 75; new pupils--boys 5; girls, 6; total, 11. The average attendance, 53; average number of pupils attending, 61.
                      J. A. Bish, Principal.
Medford Mail, December 13, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    We are pleased to note that Wilbur Ashpole is so far recovered as to be able to be around again.
    A. J. Daley has received a new invoice of goods this week and is doing lots of business these days.
    Miss Lol Nichols and her cousin, Miss Scott, are visiting relatives and friends in Medford and Jacksonville this week.
    R. G. Brown went to Ashland last week on official business and while there secured a number of fruit trees, which he intends to plant on the old C. W. Taylor place.
    Mrs. R. McDonald, who has been stopping with the family of Joseph Martin during their recent illness, has returned home as they have all sufficiently recovered as to be up and around.
    Mr. Ellis and his son are progressing rapidly with their ditch, and land owners in the Sunnyside district of Eagle Point are figuring on putting in quite an acreage of fruit and vegetables this season.
    Our little town is fast coming to the front and from all appearances other people realize that this is a favorable section as well as we do, for offers have been made for real estate here recently that are far ahead of anything heretofore known in this locality.
    Last week Mesdames R. G. Brown and A. L. Haselton took a trip over the neighborhood soliciting for the family of Mr. Jack and report having succeeded remarkably well, as every person they visited donated something. Our people are always ready and willing to help those in distress.
    Mr. Jack, whose residence was recently burned, is erecting a small house on the premises. This will answer for a kitchen later on when more lumber can be secured, as it is almost impossible to secure lumber this time of the year. The family are now stopping on the old Johnson place.
    Jas. Ringer and one of his daughters, Mrs. Martin, recently from the East, came out from Central Point one day last week to see the country and to visit some old acquaintances. Mrs. Martin is very favorably impressed with the surroundings, and they will probably move here in the near future. They were the guests of Mrs. E. Pool and Mrs. Howlett.
Medford Mail, December 20, 1901, page 5



Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Jas. Ringer and Frank Pool have put up new steps to the Pool residence.
    George W. Daley, of the Willamette Valley, is visiting relatives in Eagle Point.
    Miss Mattie Matney, of Applegate, was the guest of Mrs. O. P. McGee last Sunday.
    Eli Ellis and son, Henry, went to Ashland last Saturday on business and pleasure.
    James Ringer has purchased the Emanuel Pool property, on the south side of Little Butte Creek.
    John Williscroft, our druggist, had a fine lot of candies brought out from Medford last Saturday.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Simon came up from Tolo last Friday to visit her daughter, Mrs. G. W. Daley, Sr.
    F. J. Ayres, one of our enterprising farmers, and his wife were in Medford last Saturday upon business.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Parker, of Mt. Pitt precinct, were the guests of O. P. McGee and family last Sunday night.
    Carl Ringer, son of James Ringer, came out from Central Point last week and stayed at the Sunnyside Hotel a few days.
    Miss E. O. Haynes, who has been teaching a class in instrumental music here this fall and winter, returned home last Friday.
    Mesdames W. B. Officer and J. F. Brown were in Medford last Saturday buying Christmas presents and doing general shopping.
    A. J. Daley, one of our leading merchants, was in Medford last Saturday. He brought out quite a lot of goods for his new store.
    Mrs. Paul Van Scoy, of Montague, came out last Saturday and is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Brown. She always receives a hearty welcome at her old home from her many friends.
   Last Sunday the football team from Medford came out and played a game against the Eagle Point team. The game was played in a short time and was easily won by our boys. The score was 22 to 0.
    Two strangers stopped here last Sunday. They had been up in the vicinity of Mt. Pitt, and were on their way to Roseburg to file on a tract of land in that section which has been used as a garden for some time some of the old settlers.
Medford Mail, December 27, 1901, page 3


Eagle Point's Onion Crop.
    The land immediately surrounding Eagle Point, while of excellent quality for growing almost anything that can be produced anyplace in the valley, is especially adapted for growing onions, and in this respect it is unlike much of the land in the valley. It was only a few years ago that the people out that way drifted, sort o' gradual like, into the onion industry, and the fact that many of the at first small fields have by this time grown into larger ones, the evidence seems overwhelmingly convincing that it is a good business to tie to. The crop this year is up to the average, if anything a little larger than last season.
    Among the more prominent growers this season are Brown Bros., who have 120,000 pounds; A. L. Haselton, 90,000 pounds; Royal Brown, 30,000 pounds; Frank Lewis, 25,000; Jos. Moomaw, 25,000; Nick Young, 20,000; Baxter Robinson, 20,000; Geo. Haines, 20,000; Mrs. Robt. Jack, 10,000. These are all growers in and adjoining Eagle Point. Up the creek there were grown this season from 75,000 to 100,000 pounds. Among the growers in this locality are Charlie Terrilll, Lem Charley, A. Bieberstedt, W. G. Messal and Mr. Haefft. The total output of Eagle Point and vicinity this season will reach very close to 500,000 pounds. The price paid this year is one cent a pound. This hardly up to the price previously paid. The crop is being purchased principally by Geo. Brown & Sons, Eagle Point merchants, but Medford merchants are buying some of the crop. Messrs. Brown & Sons are now shipping about 15,000 pounds daily. Many of the growers will increase their acreage next year, Mr. Haines being one who will increase--to three acres next year.
Medford Mail, November 7, 1902, page 6


Also see the 1903 diary of Eagle Point resident Alice Catherine Simon Daley.


Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    J. T. Kinney and son has bought the Claggs' places, near Tyler Soda Springs, from B. V. Lewis.
    Miss Edna Charley, who is attending school at Eagle Point, visited home Sunday.
    Misses Donna and Mabel Belle left here for Ashland immediately after the holidays, where they are attending normal school.
    George Brown is spending the winter in Medford. He is attending business college there.
    Mrs. Mary C. Osborne died Jan. 15, 1903. She was born in France, May 18th, 1843, being 59 years, 8 months, and 3 days old. Mrs. Osborne, with her husband and son, came to Brownsboro about six years ago. They had a cozy little home and lived very happily. Mrs. Osborne's health failed about two years ago, though it improved greatly during the past summer, but the chilling blasts of winter were too much and death claimed her for the heavenly home. She leaves a husband and two sons to mourn her loss. One son resides here, the other in Elwood, Neb. Kind friends and sorrowing relatives followed the remains to the cemetery, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. Kinney.
Medford Mail, January 23, 1903, page 3



Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    Mr. Baldwin, who was very sick, is getting better.
    The hills around the city are beginning to look green once more.
    Miss Mabel Hall, who has been on the sick list for a long time, is on the road to recovery.
    Mr. McCasty has leased the Baldwin ranch and town property for a period of two years.
    We understand that Mr. and Mrs. Dee Bradshaw are the happy parents of a bouncing boy.
    The stockmen of this locality are praying for spring and green grass, as their hay mows are getting very low.
    Geo. Brown, one of our promising young men, who is attending the Medford College, was visiting home folks last Saturday.
    Mrs. C. J. Geer, who has been very sick the past two weeks, is on the road to recovery, under the treatment of Dr. Officer.
    Mr. Aller and wife intend leaving our little town in a few days for their old home in Iowa. We will miss them, as they are two fine people.
    James K. Belle, our enterprising postmaster and merchant, has gone in the wood business, so if anyone wants wood cut, it will pay them to interview James.
    Mr. James Howard and family have moved on Carl Beiversteidt's ranch, better known as the old Matinee place. Jim figures on putting in a large crop.
    Delbert Terrill, one of Butte Creek's leading stockmen, has sold his band of cattle to Tom Kinney, and figures on leaving Butte Creek on account of his health.
    Thos. Hawkins, our leading merchant, is contemplating on going into the garden business quite extensively. Tommy is also quite a horse trader, if anyone should ask you.
    Richard Besse was in our little town early Monday morning with a boot and shoe man, interviewing our merchants. You can bet when Dick takes the boys they always get there on time.
    We are informed that Miss Mabel Belle was one of the successful ones who took the late examination, and has got her a school in Klamath County. Her many friends wish her success.
Medford Mail, March 13, 1903, page 5



Brownsboro Items.
BY REBECCA.
    Harley Hall, who has spent the winter in Yreka, came home recently upon hearing of his sister Mabel's illness.
    R. R. Wright, of Big Butte, was trading in town Monday. He was also the guest of Capt. West and family during the noontide of the day.
    Jesse Allen and Mr. Kelley, of Nebraska, arrived here a few days since for quite an extensive visit with the former's relatives, W. H. Bradshaw and family.
    Farmers are very busy with their spring work since the recent breaking up of the storms. There is even more activity among stockmen; though some have lost stock, some have come through well, generally speaking, considering the long period of feeding, and a good many are turning part of their cattle onto the spring range.
    Someone, seeming to feel that our thriving little town should be represented to the Mail oftener, wrote items last week under our signature. The items were nice and we believe all was meant well, yet we kindly ask that anyone wishing to write would please do so under their own signature, as we do not wish to be responsible for what others write. (The print shop was responsible for this mistake. We have several new printers employed and one of them made the mistake of crediting the items to "Rebecca."--ED.)
Medford Mail, March 20, 1903, page 3



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Last revised October 9, 2019