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The Infamous Black BirdSouthern Oregon History, Revised



The Dowell Papers
Rogue River Indian War correspondence June 14 through November 11, 1855, collected by B. F. Dowell

Oregon Indian
Wars
   
Principally the War
of
1855-6
in
Southern Oregon
   
Volume 4th
Original Orders and
Letters
Collected & Compiled
by
B. F. Dowell
   
1878

    At a meeting of the People held at Lindley's school house of Jackson County, June 14th 1855 for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of organizing a Military Company, S. M. Wait was called to the chair and H. H. Church appointed Secretary. H. B. Hayes being called up stated the object of the meeting.
    On motion Resolved that we deem it necessary to organize a Military Company for the better protection of life and property from the surrounding Indians. On motion Resolved that the following article be signed by those willing to join such a Company. We the undersigned do unite ourselves for the purpose of forming a Military Company for purposes above specified.
    Whereupon the following names were obtained:
            Henry B. Hayes S. M. Wait

M. M. Williams Thom Arundell

Geo. T. Vining N. O. Kelley

J. F. Anderson Chas. Bloomer

G. H. Judy Dan Britton

R. R. Gates Wm. Lynch

Dennis Bishop H. H. Church

A. Giddings Thom. Chase

A. G. Carter Lewis Calhoun

John B. Sifers John Cosby

D. T. Geiger Walter Miller

J. W. Funk John B. Sumner

R. V. Drake J. Spores

S. C. Duncan T. I. Sutherland

Harrison B. Oatman S. Sisley

Harvey B. Oatman D. Sutter

William Pasley Jas.Hayes

Franklin Pickle A. C. Harrison

C. S. Fee Geo. Harris

J. H. Ridley A. Hawkins

G. Rockafellar [Rockfellow] Alex. Thompson

A. Rockafellar D. H. Taylor

W. S. Ruppe Jonathan Tharp

E. A. Rice John Van Dyke

D. B. Rinehart Jas. Westerdale

Wm. Rockafellar W. N. West

Wallace Bishop
    The Company then proceeded to the election of officers, which resulted in the choice of Henry B. Hayes for Captain, M. M. Williams 1st Lieutenant, Geo. T. Vining 2nd Lieut., J. F. Anderson 3rd Lieut. 2nd 2nd Lieut., Geo. H. Judy 1st Sergt., R. R. Gates 2nd Ser., Dennis Bishop 3rd Serg., A. Giddings 4th Serg., Alex Carter 1st Corporal, John B. Sifers 2nd, D. T. Geiger, J. W. Funk 4th Cor., S. M. Wait Quarter Master.
    On motion Resolved that the Officers of the Company call it together whenever they deem it necessary.
On motion adjourned.
    S. M. Wait, Chairman
    H. H. Church, Secretary
   
    At a meeting of the Company held June 17th / 55 the following resolutions were adopted--
    Resolved that this Company be known as the Independent Rangers.
    Resolved that this Company consider themselves now subject to the laws of this Territory--Organized--When sanctioned by the proper authorities--an Independent Company--and that the Captain-elect and other commissioned Officers of the company be directed to report themselves to the Commanding Officer of this County for his sanction and approval.
S. M. Wait, Chairman
D. T. Geiger, Secretary


At Home
    August 28th, 1855
Friend Martin
    Another stampede of Indians from the reserve has occurred and it is supposed that nearly all those who were engaged in the late massacres in your section of country are among them. I believe that only two only of the transgressors on that occasion are in the custody charge of the military. A detachment of troops have gone in pursuit, but I have little faith in their success in the present instance or that they will ever be able to procure all the perpetrators of the murder at Buckeye Bar the Indians more than they already have of the Indians whom you recently traced to the reserve here in this valley. The story that two squaws were killed by miners on Big Bar (Rogue River) is false--false as Hell. Nothing of that sort has taken place and the origin of that report has been traced to James Metcalfe--a sort of boss farmer for the Indians. This falsehood was no doubt manufactured and circulated for no other [purpose] than that of creating a sympathy for the Indians here, and to bring the acts praiseworthy efforts of the citizens of Siskiyou County avenge the death of Chapman & generally to promote the public welfare into dispute. In this, however, he has utterly failed, and you may rest assured that although we are in Oregon--in a country whose every executive officer is an Indian sympathizer--and where [remainder of page cut off on scan]
----
Jacksonville
    9th June 1855
George L. Curry
    Governor of Oregon
        Sir
            In obedience to the duty devolving upon me as Quartermaster General and in pursuance of orders from you to that effect, I applied to Chs. S. Drew, late Quarter Master General, for all papers and documents appertaining to that office, which he refused to deliver into my hands.
    Armed, however, with authority from you, I took possession of the papers, &c. which I found in an iron safe in the express office of Mr. Richard Dugan and retaining the key of the safe in my possession.
    In making a casual inspection of the papers, I found have to report that I found and inspected duplicates of the principal portion, but not all as some were missing of the muster rolls and accounts of the late Rogue River war. The muster rolls bear the certificates of the Capt. of companies respectively as well as that of Capt. J. P. Goodall as mustering officer.
    The hospital bills, amounting to about ten thousand dollars bear the certificate of Mr. E. H. Cleveland as Surgeon & Medical Director. Some of these bills are missing.
    I found by an abstract amongst the papers, as well as by noticing that there was some missing numbers amongst the duplicate the whole of them abstracted and missing, and learned that Maj. Drew had opened the safe with another key and carried off the papers belonging to the Quarter Master and Commissary Department as well as the duplicate muster rolls of the troops.
    Under these circumstances, I deem it my duty to make to you a report of these facts, and to respectfully suggest that duplicates be immediately applied for at the proper department in Washington as it is obvious that the duties of my office cannot well and properly be performed without having these papers to refer to at all times, and that any necessity for this abstraction or concealment should exist is a proof that they should be thoroughly inspected and strictly scrutinized.
I have the honor to be, sir,
    Very respectfully, your
        obt. servant,
            John F. Miller
                Q.M. Genl., O.M.


Territory of Oregon
    Executive Office
        Salem July 26th 1855
Gen. John F. Miller
    Dear Sir,
        I have caused a copy of your letter of the 9th ult. to be forwarded to the proper department at Washington. I shall regret if the payment of any just claim is delayed in consequence. But the course pursued by Mr. Drew in the abstraction of the duplicate accounts of the expenses of the Rogue River war left no other alternative.     In the meantime, whatever Treasury drafts are delivered from this office, care will be taken to ascertain that they are to liquidate just claims.
    No more drafts will be forwarded by mail, but will be handed to the proper parties in person or to their regularly appointed attorneys, which you will please make known.
Yours very respectfully,
    Geo. L. Curry
        Governor of Oregon


Territory of Oregon
    Executive Office
        Salem July 27th 1855
Hon. Elisha Whittlesey
    1st Comptroller of the Treasury
        Sir,
            I have deemed it my duty to cause the enclosed copy of correspondence to be transmitted. It is in relation to the expenses of the late Rogue River War. Probably a schedule of the accounts addressed to this office showing the items and amount of each account will be satisfactory, excluding the accounts of Capt. Nesmith's Company, which constituted a distinct expenditure and which accounts I know to be correct as they passed my own inspection.
    If the enclosed have not [reached] their proper destination, will you do me the favor to place them in a course to reach it.
    It is needless perhaps for me to advise you that no Treasury drafts for the payment of the expenses of the Rogue River war will hereafter be delivered from this office unless we are satisfied of the correctness of the expense.
I am very respectfully
    Your obedient servt.
        Geo. L. Curry
            Governor of Oregon


Jackson Co., O.T.
    Skull Bar   Gold River
        Oct. 23 [1855]
Col. J. E. Ross
    Sir
        I take my pen in hand to inform you of proceeding of Company E up to this date. On yesterday, we were relieved considerably by the arrival of Capt. Rinearson's Company and on the following morning, 23 by an escort and surgeon from Ft. Lane and I am happy to inform you that they found our wounded in a fine condition under the circumstances.
    Sir, the plans concluded upon by majority & myself at present is as follows: under the circumstances and condition of our wounded, it is impossible to leave this point for a few days yet and the dragoons in hands at present will be compelled to move towards the fort again, in consequence of being no feed for their animals and I have come to the conclusion by advice to call upon your aid to support us with about 40 volunteers at the earliest practicable period to enforce us to get out at a more comfortable place to quarter, especially for our helpless wounded. We are well prepared to receive our enemy again but are not able to guard ourselves to a more safer point for protection. Sir, at this point, we have a considerable portion of government stores at this point turned over to Co. E by Crandall & Wilson which will have to be moved at the same time and my request is for you to give orders for all the mules belonging to Crandall & Wilson scattered along the river from Vannoy's down to the [mouth?] of Jump Off Jo to aid in packing out these [cut off on scan] and furthermore, please send us all the arms that [you] can gather up and we will put them to good use [cut off on scan] subject. At present I bring this report to a close.
Yours most respectfully,
    Capt. [cut off on scan]


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart, Nov. 5th / 55
Capt. R. L. Williams
    Co. D 9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            You will furnish an escort of [blank] men
            You will immediately dispatch 20 men of your command to escort the train loaded with Ordinance, Ordinance Stores, etc. use government account from Illinois Valley to Fort Lane. Eight men are also detailed from Capt. Welton's Co. for this service.
[unsigned]


At Home October 8th 1855
Friend Berry
    A battle was fought this morning with a portion of the Indians of this valley in which about twenty-five Indians were killed and a large number wounded, many of them mortally. On the part of the whites, ten or twelve were wounded; two of among whom are cannot survive Major Lupton, and George Sheppard, both mortally, Pelton, Hereford, J. S. Miller, Gates & Williams have received wounds. The two former, it is supposed to be mortally cannot survive. The plan of attack was arranged by James Bruce and was admirably executed. The regular troops had nothing to do with the transaction were in their quarters. The loss on the part of the Indians would have been much larger had not the plans been partially betrayed by the Indian agent and the officers at Fort Lane who had surmised that such an occurrence was about to take place and had advised the Indians to be on their guard.
Unsigned draft letter, apparently by B. F. Dowell. On the back of the letter is written "My letter to J. Berry of Oct. 8th 1855."


Forest Dale
    Jackson County O.T.
        October 12th 1855
Editor Oregonian:
    I am under the painful necessity of informing you that our predictions relative to another Indian war have been more than realized.
    The impending storm which that has so long been visible to the candid observer, and of which so much has been said and written, has burst upon our devoted heads, and we are now reaping the rich bitter fruits of Indian philanthropy, the results accruing from a corrupt administration of Indian affairs, particularly in Southern Oregon. It is useless, however, for me to comment upon It is useless, however, at the present time to comment farther upon this subject at the. Former communications relative to these matters have given you a partially correct true understanding some idea of the true condition of the dangers which have to some extent advised you of the dangers to which we have been exposed for months past, and the utter neglect or refusal of those to whose care our rights are confided to adopt such measure such means as would frustrate the evil designs of a savage foe.
    For the present, I or until the hostilities cease, I shall content myself with giving you a simple narrative of facts, as they transpire.
    Since my last communication, this entire section of country has been the scene of the most heart-rending massacres that has ever befallen the lot of man to behold witness.
    At daybreak on Monday last (October 8th) the volunteer forces by a preconcerted action made a simultaneous attack upon three camps of Indians who had left the reserve with the manifest intention of committing depredations within the settlements upon the settlers above the reserve in the vicinity of Butte Creek, fifteen miles from Jacksonville.
    The plan of operations was admirably laid out well arranged and admirably laid out. Not less than forty Indians paid suffered the penalty they had so long and so justly merited. The battle lasted four hours. Unfortunately, however, several citizens were wounded in the conflict, one of whom (J.A. Lupton, member-elect to the Assembly) has since died.
    On the following morning by the several tribes on Rogue River by who had commenced committing depredations in June last consummated the act which they had so long premeditated. Between Jewett's Ferry and Grave Creek fifteen upwards Jump Off Joe (Creek) at in a distance of thirty-five miles, upwards of fifteen persons are known to have been killed, including men, women and children. On the morning of this deplorable affair, Mr. Wagoner at Louse Rose Creek, left home his house to accompany Miss Pellett to Vannoy's Ferry, a distance of four miles, leaving none at home but his wife and child and an Indian, who had frequently been employed as a servant about the premises. On his return from the ferry, he discovered his barn on fire and some thirty well-armed Indians in and around his house. Knowing that it would be worse than useless to attempt the rescue of his family, unarmed as he was, he immediately proceeded to alarm the neighborhood. But sad to relate, all had shared alike.
    Mr. Jones, living three miles south of Wagoner's, was killed and his wife mortally wounded--has since died. Along the road to Evans' Ferry, several men were found dead in the road, teams killed and goods destroyed. On returning to Mr. Wagoner's house Mrs. Wagoner was burned and the remains of Mrs. Wagoner and daughter lay smoldering in the ruins, and on proceeding to the house of Mr. Harris, twenty-four hours after the attack, the owner was found dead and the Indians found surrounding a piece thicket of brushwood. The Indians how immediately fled and when from the thicket, to the joy of all present, emerged Mrs. Harris, bearing in her arms her wounded child. Mr. Harris as It seems that Mr. Harris was killed by an Umpqua Indian at the onset. Before dying, however, he directed dictated to his wife, who was wholly unskilled in the use of firearms, the manner of loading his rifle. With this and a revolver she kept possession of the house for twelve hours. Day Night coming on she retreated to the Their little girl, who was seriously wounded, kept a constant lookout through the apertures of the ceiling and reported to her mother from time to time of the near approach of Indians the enemy. Night coming on, Mrs. Harris retreated to the thicket destitute of bullets, yet notwithstanding kept up an incessant fire with powder alone until the moment of her rescue. The family of Mr. Haines living in that vicinity is also massacred murdered. Thus did this heroic woman keep twenty-five or thirty bloodthirsty Indians at bay for the space of twenty-four hours and that too without even a morsel of food, or even a drop of water.
    Mr. Haines and family, living in that vicinity, are also murdered and other families are yet to be heard from. It is more than probable, however, that all the families living in that vicinity of the mouth of have all shared the same fate. Col. Ross has with his characteristic promptitude has mustered into service several companies of mounted volunteers who are rendering excellent service, and if the desire of all concerned is carried into effect, the occupation of an Indian agent here, like Othello's, will be gone.
    The policy pursued by parties to whom I have heretofore referred, relative to the official acts of those who have who have been engaged taken an active part in suppressing Indian hostilities in years past, has destroyed the confidence of many that the general government would remunerate those render compensation for service rendered or supplies furnished, consequently the requisite supplies for this emergency are compelled to be raised by direct contributions of money, provisions, &c. from our citizens; a burden which they are illy able to bear.
[C. S. Drew]


    1. T. S. Harris Capt. Co. "A"
2. James Bruce " " "B"
3. Jacob S. Rinearson " " "C"
4. R. L. Williams " " "D"
5. W. B. Lewis " " "E"
6. A. S. Welton " " "F"
7. Miles F. Alcorn " " "G"
8. W. A. Wilkinson " " "H"
9. T. Smith " " "I"
10. S. A. Frye " " "K"
11. Abel George " " "L"
12. "M"
13. "N"
14. "O"
15. "P"


Regimental Order No. 3:
Head Quarters
    9th Regt. Oregon Militia
        Jacksonville October 12th 1855

Sir:
    Owing to the present condition of matters relating pertaining to Indian affairs in Southern Oregon throughout this regimental district, the colonel commanding desires you to report to him in person at your earliest convenience.
Very respectfully yours,
    John E. Ross
        Col. Commanding 9th Regt., O.M
James H. Russell
    Major 9th Regt., O.M
Per C. S. Drew
    Actg. Adjt.


Names of Persons Killed by Indians
    Date Remarks
Cunningham Killed on the Siskiyou
Field do.
Warner Head of Cottonwood
Keene Emigrant Trail
October 8 Lupton On Rogue River
October 9 Mrs. Wagoner On Louse Creek
October 9 Mary Wagoner ditto
October 9 Jones & wife ditto
October 9 Harris & son ditto
October 9 Haines family ditto



In Camp
    Oct. 15th [1855]
Friend Drew
    Sir
        I express Lieut. Stone to Jacksonville to have the company admitted and anything you can do to facilitate the object will be duly appreciated. I have a company that are select and all I ask is to be supported. Rumor as well as facts is prevalent to the effect of much trouble in this region.
Resp. yours,
    R. L. Williams


Head Quarters
    Adj. General's Office
        Portland, O.T. Oct. 16, 1855
Sir
    Herewith you will find blank muster rolls, 2 for each company in your battalion. You will instruct the commanding officer of each company to have them carefully filled up (the names of privates in alphabetical order) and whenever a soldier furnishes his own horse, equipments or arms, the appraised value of each to be set in appropriate columns opposite the soldier's name.
    This will be necessary so that if either are lost in the campaign, the pay may be drawn from government.
    Transmit one copy of each when returned to you to this office.
    When the horses or arms are furnished from the Quarter Master's Department, they will simply note in same columns, "By Territory." You will bear in mind that upon accuracy and completeness of detail in the muster rolls mainly depends the certainty of payment by general government of the expense of the campaign. 
    Upon the receipt of the muster rolls by this office, commissions will issue to the officer entitled thereto.
Very respectfully yours,
    E. M. Barnum, Adj. Gen.
To the Comd Officer
    Of 2nd Battalion
        Oregon Mounted Volunteers


Applegate Oct. 16--1855
    Hon. Geo. H. Ambrose
Dr. Sir
    I drop you a line in haste to say to you that there are Indians in our neighborhood. A young man living with me saw some in my potato patch yesterday evening and shot at them. Some of our boys were up the creek yesterday and saw fresh Indian sign. I sent word to Capt. Williams that you wanted to see him, that you wished him to raise a volunteer company. This I done upon the authority of Mr. Strickland as I did not nor could get to see you myself. My family are unwell and two young men at my house very sick, one with the flux and will probably die. We keep guard at night with only 4 able for duty. We are in distress and cannot move the sick to better ourselves. I think the Indian on this creek might be captured quite easy now with good management.
    I sincerely hope Capt. Williams proceeding will meet your approbation.
Your obedient servant
    M. C. Barkwell


Jackson County O.T.
    Skull Bar Oct. the 18th 1855
Col. John E. Ross
    Sir, on the yesterday the 17th of this month, early in the morning, we were attacked by the Indians severely which ensued in a long and fierce battle that lasted for 8 hours in fact. It seemed that the savages were determined to defeat us, but with brave and energetic men we hit them back, reserved our fire until we could see the white of their eye and every fire we made lessened their numbers, but with painful intelligence we had 2 good men killed [illegible] with 10 severely wounded and I am fearful that more may prove mortal. We are placed here in a perilous situation surrounded by upwards of 100 well-armed and -equipped Indians and I call upon your honor for reinforcements. The attack from the enemy was resumed on the 18, but the boys coolly secured them and kept them at bay. They withdrew early without loss in either side, but on yesterday I am proud to inform your honor that we sent a [illegible] redskins to their long home. Messrs. Crandall & Wilson will be the loser to the amount of 4 or 5 thousand dollars in dry goods & groceries destroyed by the Indians. I am proud to boast that we fought the hardest fought battle that was ever fought this side [of] the Rocky Mountains, more than 25 hundred shots from the enemy but every man stood his ground and fought the battle of a lover of his country [illegible] the action I received a severe wound in my [illegible], also a slight wound in the back. Also Lieutenant Moore received 3 wounds on through the calf of the leg one in the back and one slightly in the head. I call on you for the [illegible] of a surgeon which is much needed, for our wounded is suffering severely. I will look immediately [illegible] for we will maintain our position at the peril of  our lives. We have but 15 good guns fit for action. Do all you can in the way of getting us arms is my ardent wish. Nothing more at present but remain yours most respectfully,
Capt. W. B. Lewis
   
[written on the reverse of the above]
Capt. W. B. Lewis
Report of the Battle
at Galice Creek
17th October


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. Oregon Militia
        Camp Stuart Oct. 19th 1855
John Hillman &
J. B. Wagoner
    Sirs
        As It appears evident that a system of communication has been kept up with by the enemy through the agency of squaws and Indian boys, living with citizens in the vicinity of Galice Creek, which as a matter of course operates injuriously to the service and the general good public welfare.
    You are therefore required to proceed forthwith to the neighborhood of Galice Creek and arrest all such squaws and Indian boys as you may find living in any manner whatsoever that will enable them to act as spies for the enemy. You will report immediately to Captain Lewis, now on duty in that vicinity, who is authorized to render any assistance you may desire. You will resort to force or any means to secure their arrest and conveyance to Fort Lane or to this place, or if necessary treat them as foes in the field.
By order
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew
    Actg. Adjt.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 19th 1855
Captain A. J. Smith
    Comdg. Fort Lane O.T.
        Sir
            The Col. Comdg. has today dispatched to Galice Creek and vicinity Mr. Hillman and Mr. Wagoner for the purpose of taking into custody such squaws and Indian boys as are living with citizens in that neighborhood.
    The object of this movement is to destroy the means of communication with the enemy.
    Captain. Lewis is on duty in that quarter and is instructed to render assistance if necessary in procuring their arrest, and also to aid in their conveyance to your station, or elsewhere as my be deemed advisable. Messrs Hillman and Wagoner are instructed to wait upon you in order that you may also detail a few men on this service should you desire to do so. The Col. Comdg. is desirous that a mutual understanding shall exist between the legally constituted agents of the government and the militia in all matters, particularly those pertaining to the public welfare.
By order
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew, Adjt.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 19th 1855
Regimental Order
    Captain W. B. Lewis
        Comdg. Co. "E" 9th Regt., O.M.
            Sir
                The Col. Comdg. has this day dispatched Mr. John Hillman and J. B. Wagoner to take into custody all such squaws and Indian boys as are living with citizens in your neighborhood.
    You will render every assistance in your power to ferret them out and secure their arrest, and if necessary to aid in their conveyance to Head Quarters or Fort Lane.
    You are hereby fully authorized to adopt such measures as will effectually consummate this object.
By order
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew, Adjt.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart October 20th 1855
Dr. E. B. Stone
    Sir
        Reposing full confidence in your ability and skill as surgeon and physician, I have this day appointed you assistant surgeon in the 9th Regt. Oregon Militia.
Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Jacksonville October 12th 1855
Dr. Patterson
    Sir
        Reposing implicit confidence in your skill and ability as surgeon and physician, I have this day appointed you Asst. Surgeon in the 9th Regt. O.M.
Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.


Jackass Creek, Jackson Co.
    Oct. 21, 1855
Sir
    The pack animal that was furnished me to transport government stores to the army the last I saw of it was going over the divide between Jackass Creek & town, head up & tail curled over her back & going at about twenty two feet, government stores flying over the tops of pine trees. I hollered Go it old gal, you're on the right road to the army.
Your most obedient
    D. M. Texas
    High Private
    In Rear Rank
    Of Cap. Harris
    Comp. of Applegate Rangers
To Col. John E. Ross
    Comd. in Chief
   

P.S.: T. L. Linksmile mourns the loss of [a] great [deal] more than the mare and the beef. He stampeded but we overtook him
    And William thank [sic]
    I send my respects to Cap. Wilkinson for furnishing us a gentle animal that never had a bridle on.
William Pasley


Illinois Valley, October 21 / 55
    We the citizens of Deer Creek and Illinois Valley do consider our situation in rather a perilous condition on account of the Indians of this vicinity. Though we have fortified and prepared to resist them at the best advantage that our limited means will permit, yet we do not feel satisfied that our lives and properties is safe and for this reason we the citizens do petition to your honor and pray that you will grant that an armed force of volunteers be organized and stationed at different points in this vicinity so that they can concentrate at one point, if necessity and duty requires such. We do think that less than forty or fifty well-mounted men would be few enough to assist at the present time in this vicinity and we do further petition to your honor and pray that you will consider our perilous situation and grant said petition as we do verily believe that necessity and safety require such. Whereunto we do fix our names as citizens of said valley.
    John D. Post A. J. Henderson
Wm. Chapman Wm. B. Hay
G. E. Briggs L. Reves
J. N. Knight Jas. Kerby
C. Cattinell R. T. Olds
Samuel White S. Scott
Wm. E. Randolf O. E. Riley
Frederick Rhoda J. T. L. Mills
L. D. Hart
Alex McBride
[name(s) cut off on scan]


Grave Creek Camp
    Oct. 22nd  / 55
Col. J. E. Ross
    9th Reg O.M
        Sir I beg leave to report that on the night of the 19th last I recd. a dispatch from Capt. Lewis on Galice Creek, stating that they had been attacked by a large band of Indians, two of his men killed and ten wounded and requested assistance. I immediately made arrangements accordingly and on the morning of the 20th started with forty men. On our way crossed the trail of three Indians on horseback, apparently not having passed one hour before. My arrangements then would not allow a chase or I think we could have overtaken them.
    I arrived at Capt. L. camp about 4 o'clock p.m. All quiet. The two men who were killed already buried, the wounded getting along as well as could be expected under the circumstances. On our return met dragoons going down to remove the wounded.
    Some of my men have the flux bad. No medical aid at hand. What can be done? 
    What has been usual when you wish to send a dispatch from one point to another?  Should I find it proper to inform you of the movements of the Indians, must I furnish cash to pay expenses?
    D. Evans charged myself and men for supper and bed 2 meals & horses' feed 3.50 each and my men having guarded his barn during the night by his request, I requested him not to require pay of the men, they having stood guard one night and besides I had no doubt but they would get pay from the government for accommodations furnished volunteers, but he seemed to think nothing short of cash would do him.
    I understand that the Governor has made a call for a thousand men to march against the upper country Indians. Should this be true, I wish to return home. I now request your permission to do so. I suppose the company would not object under the circumstances. At all events, I should like to hear from headquarters occasionally.
    I will get Dr. Henry to go to Jacksonville if he will. Should he come, he will tell you how times pass.
    I have the honor, dear sir, to remain your obt. ser.
J. S. Rinearson, Capt.
    Co. C, 9th Reg., O.M.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 22nd 1855
Capt. R. L. Williams
    Co. "D" Mtd. Vols 9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            The Col. Comdg. desires you to proceed to Galice Creek and vicinity with all possible dispatch with what disposable force you have, to remain until the wounded men at that post, together with the supplies there, can be removed to a place of safety.
    Capt. Rinearson will also detail twenty men for this service. There seems to be a large body of Indians located in that neighborhood, and some solicitude is felt for the safety of the command of Capt. Welton as it is exceedingly unwell. You will be governed in your movements relative to this company, by your superior knowledge of the country and the necessities of the case. In no case, however, will the post at Galice be left unguarded.
[unsigned copy]


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 22nd / 55
Capt. F. R. Hill
    Comdg. Co. "M" Mtd. Vols
        9th Regt. O.M.
            Sir
                You will proceed, with as little delay as possible, to muster into service one or two companies of Mtd. men to aid in the suppression of Indian hostilities now existing in Southern Oregon. You will rendezvous at Grave Creek and report, as soon as you have mustered, for further orders, and you will also procure all the information in your power relative to the enemy.
By order
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew, Adjt.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 22nd 1855
Capt. R. L. Williams
    Co. "D" 9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            It is the desire of the Col. Comdg. that you proceed with as little [delay] as possible to the vicinity of Galice Creek, to remain until the wounded men at that post can be removed to more convenient quarters.
    Capt. Rinearson is instructed to detail twenty men for this service. It is obvious that a large body of Indians are located in the vicinity of Galice, and it may be necessary to keep a good lookout for their movements in other directions in that neighborhood as Capt. Welton is in that section of country with a command entirely too small to cope with so large a number of Indians successfully. In your movements relative to this company, you will be guided by your own superior knowledge of the country and the necessities of the case. In no instance, however, will the post at Galice be left without a sufficient force for its protection.
Respectfully yours,
    John E. Ross
        [Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.]
[Per C. S. Drew, Adjt.]


Ills.[Illinois] Valley Oct. 23rd [1855]
Col. John E. Ross
    Sir, arrived in the Ills. Valley after leaving Head Quarters, on the evening of the 20th and nothing of importance transpired up to the 23rd and on the morning of that day I received one bell horse and six mules for transportation and bought some provisions and struck camp. On the morning of the 24th I started down the Ills. River and camped with 33 men and made some tents. On the 25th, information came to camp of the robbing of two pack trains on the Mooney Mountain, and the killing of all the men belonging to the train with the exception of two Spaniards who were behind the train fixing a pack, and that they heard the firing of some fifty guns. This information came late on the evening of the 25th. Early in the morning of the 26th I started with 16 men for the Mooney Mountain, leaving two men to guard our pack animals, and seven I sent out as scouts towards the head of Chetco River, supposing that the Indians were encamped near there in a placed called Onion Valley. On my arrival at Mr. Mooney's, I found that Captn. Williams had been there and brought in the men that were killed, two in number and both Spaniards, and he also drove in all the pack animals that he could find. He also found on the mountain 23 mules and two horses that had been killed by the Indians. I did not see the Captn. myself but I was told that he was on trail of the Indians and were making for the head of Deer Creek Valley. I also heard by two of my men that they heard the Indians [were] shooting and singing above Northcutt's house which is at the head of Deer Creek Valley, some three miles from Mooney's. I immediately turned my course from the mountain and struck for Northcutt's house, and when I arrived there I found them in a great state of excitement. They said that they had just had a fight with the Indians and saw some fifteen of them. They also saw them run into the willows, about 1½ miles above the house. I called a halt and tied our horses, and went on foot after them, and in about 150 yds. of the house we found two dogs killed and about 100 yards from there I found one colt, I suppose about 2 years old, that they had shot. I went on still further and saw an Indian on horseback. He rode within 300 yards of us and then whirled his horse and gave the Indian yell and struck for the brush. I followed on his trail and found where they had been the night before. I also found one axe and one mule that they had killed and had partly eaten them up. From the looks of the mule and the beef, I should think that they love mule meat the best. There the trail ended. We could not find which [direction] they went from there. I still kept up the creek and came to another camp where the fires were still burning. I think that they heard us coming and left there. We found 8 head of oxen and one horse that they had killed. We also found 4 mules; I suppose that they did not have time to kill them or they would have done so. We drove the mules out and they were proven [illegible] by the Spaniard and given up. The Indians shot at us once and run. We could not see him but we could hear him running. We camped at Northcutt's that night. The Indians were [several words cut off on scan] night. They hollered at us once. I asked them what they wanted. They then wanted to know what I wanted. I told them to come down, I wanted to make a treaty with them. At that, they sent two bullets over our heads. The 27th, I left for Kerby's ranch to buy a beef and left orders for the men to move Mr. Northcutt to Fort Smith, which was done that day, and on the 28th I sent a detachment of 18 men as an escort with Mr. Fowler and Davis and Lady, also two pack trains to go as far as Dr. Barkwell's and then return with the pack trains lying there for C. City which was done on the 29th, and on the 30th the whole command laid up at headquarters, Camp Cole, awaiting for the government train, which came that evening, and on the morning of the 31st I started with the command for Jacksonville and headquarters, Camp Stuart as an escort for the government train and 8 other trains, and that night camped at Camp Fort Hay. And on the 1st Nov. we camped at Mr. Pardee's and on the morning of the 2nd I left the escort in charge of the 2nd Lieut. and came to headquarters. The escort camped at Mr. Benedict's and on the 3rd they arrived at headquarters and on the 4th, 4th and 6th we laid at headquarters and on the 6th, according to order of Col. John E. Ross, I sent a detachment of eight men as an escort with Maj. Fowler, and pack trains, and at the crossing of Applegate between Vannoy's and Mooney's they took two squaws and one child prisoners which were afterwards killed by two discharged men of my company. This was on the 10th that they were taken. On the 11th, the squaws was killed. On the morning of the 7th Nov., according to orders, I started for Fort Vannoy as an escort with two pack trains and eight wagons and arrived there without any difficulty and camped that night below the mouth of the Applegate. On the 9th and 10th laid there and on the morning of the 11th I started to the assistance of Maj. Fowler, then supposed to be camped in the vicinity of Slate Creek, but I could not find him. He had went on to the Ills. Valley. And on the 12th I found the two squaws and one child that had been killed the day before by Thos. Moore and Peter Snellback, one discharged on the 7th Nov. and the other on the 11th of Nov. And on the 13th, about 12 o'clock, arrived at Vannoy's and transferred the men belonging to Company K to Company D., that is, all that wanted to go, the rest discharged.
S. A. Frye Captn.
    Comp. K 9th Regt. O.M.


Camp at Butte Creek Station
    October 23rd 1855
Col. J. E. Ross
    Sir,
        In accordance with your inst. to report the movements of the company under my command, I herewith transmit them. Reports had come to my camp on several different occasions that houses had been plundered and considerable property destroyed. At each time, I went with a detachment to pursue and if possible to overtake and bring the perpetrators to punishment, and so far have been unsuccessful. Yesterday we came in sight of a fellow who had robbed Mr. Bozart's house on Antelope Creek, but it was near night and the Indians were in a place inaccessible to us on account of the undergrowth and a deep canyon. Our horses are sadly in need of shoeing and as soon as this can be attended to we shall be able to pursue them for several days at a time and hope to be able to report more favorably in my next.
Yours with respect
    Miles F. Alcorn
        Captain Commanding Co. G
            Ninth Regiment O.M.


Jacksonville
    August 23rd [1857] O.T.
Dear Charley
    You must think strange that I do not write to you. But you know that I am a poor hand to write. You will have to excuse me. I will now endeavor to comply with your request and give you a statement in answer to your letter of March 29th, 1857 relative to the Hungry Hill or Bloody Spring fight. You know in what condition the troops of the 9th Regiment was placed at the time we received the information of the Indians being in the Grave Creek Mountains and of Lieut. Kautz' defeat, Major Fitzgerald's discovery of Indians, his message to Fort Lane & the volunteers. I received the message verbally, when on march to Galice Creek near Fort Lane, that the Indians were discovered in large force on the Grave Creek Mountains, and that Capt. Smith was a making a forced march and desired me to join him with as many men as possible. The troops that was with me I ordered to Grave Creek to join Capt. Smith's command of regulars. I sent expresses to such of the companies of the 9th Regiment as I thought could be able to get to that place in time for the engagement. Capt. Bruce and several of his men volunteered to go as spies and reconnoiter the mountains and discover the locality of the Indians. They joined Capt. Smith's spies, went together in the mountains, discovered the Indians, drew a map of the location of [the] Indians' camp and surrounding country, returned the same day to the Grave Creek House, the place of encampment. I proceeded by the way of Vannoy's to Galice Creek with J. H. Hillman, Isaac Miller & Wagoner, my express carrier, to see that Capt. Lewis and his wounded men was cared for. I met Capt. Lewis and his wounded several miles below Vannoy's fort, returned to Vannoy's, provided for the wounded men by placing them in the charge of Dr. Miller. Then with what men I could gather I hastened to join the command at Grave Creek. I arrived at Grave Creek about (8) eight o'clock in the evening. I had hardly got into the house when I was met by Capt. Smith who seized me by the arm and said I am glad to see you here; we have no time to spare, we must proceed to business and led me to a back room in which Capt. Smith and his officers and the volunteer officers was all in council together, all acting in concert and harmony together. The matter under consideration was the process of making a forced march that night. The spies was called in. They gave a description of the country, and produced a map they had taken of the Indians' locality and surrounding country, which was examined and approved by all the spies that were out; it was then concluded and agreed upon to make a forced march that night. The order was written by Captain A. J. Smith and carried by my aide to the different companies. It was then about half past ten o’clock at night and the order was to march at 11 o’clock the same night. The order was sent to the two companies of Major Martin's battalion and Captain Bailey & Gordon there in camp at the Six Bit House, also with guides and instruction what part of the country to occupy, and the plan of attack was given and explained. The hour came and the forced march commenced at near 12 o’clock at night, over rough mountains and deep dark canyons, through thickets, across streams, wandering our way through the darkness of night. All in silence to try if possible to surprise the enemy. Regulars and volunteers marched together. After some eight or ten miles of our march was made a halt was called. Capts. Bruce and Harris with their respective companies here turned to the left, supposing them to be in the neighborhood of the Indians' camp and occupy a position on the southwest of the Indians. Supposing that that would be rather in the rear, I proceeded with Capt. Smith & his command with a portion of Capts. Williams' & Welton's companies to a certain point, the place of Lieut. Kautz' defeat. We arrived there about one hour before day and was obliged to make a halt. Capt. Smith could not proceed for some time, owing to some of his officers being very much fatigued and not able to march. We was detained here some two hours. In that time, someone contrary to orders set fire to a tree, the smoke of which was discovered by the Indians and the alarm given. They at once prepared to give battle. In the meantime, our scouts discovered the Indians in large force about three miles distant across a deep canyon on a high mountain, waiting our arrival. About this time, Capts. Gordon & Bailey of Major Martin's battalion, also Capt. Rinearson with a part of his company, came up. They should have followed a trail farther to the north, but on they come charging through the woods hooping & hollering inquiring for the Indians. There was much confusion owing to the fire being started, and the troops never being brought together before.
    It was "Hurrah, boys yonder is the Indians." The men broke in disorder down the mountain through the thick brush, everyone striving who should be able to get to the top of the mountain first to engage the Indians, volunteer and regular all striving to get the first shot. The attack was commenced by Capt. Rinearson and Welton with a portion of them from various companies, some regulars. It was on the summit of a high mountain, the south side being bald with some underbrush, the north side of the mountain being large timber and thick underbrush in which the Indians fell back as our men approached. They concealed themselves and poured their deadly fire as our men approached.
    I had advised Capts. Bailey & Gordon to flank on the north side, which had to be done on a steep mountainside through heavy timber and thick underbrush. After some time trying, they failed, got several men wounded and returned to the place of attack. The firing continued fierce at that place.
    Capts. Bruce and Harris, that should have flanked on the south and west, lay concealed on a point some four hundred yards south of the place of attack, supposing the Indians would retreat in that way and they would stand a chance to cut them off, but failing, they came up and fell in at the place of attack. The firing had become general without cessation for some four hours. I was in company with Capt. Smith often through the day. About three o'clock, he asked me what I thought of making a charge. I told him that as soon as we could hear from Bailey & Gordon that was to flank on the north it would do, but until they opened their fire, it was no use. They failed & returned. Smith then made his charge, which was done with but few men. They fired some four or five rounds and was obliged to fall back with a loss of several men killed & wounded. Regular & volunteer shared the same fate. The Indians maintained their ground all day. We held ours all day.
    About sundown I selected our camp some three hundred yards from the place of fighting at a spring which we called Bloody Spring. Here we drew off to in good order, bringing our dead & wounded. All camped together, regular & volunteer, in harmony. I was with Capt. Smith often through the night. We counciled together and the Capt. proposed to strengthening our morning guard which [was] done by adding forty men more, which was done. At daylight the Indians made an attack on our camp, wounding Lieut. Gibson of the regulars. At first there was much confusion, but after a short time, I got the men placed and they soon made the red devils travail.
    You will please glean from this what you can for publication, if there is anything of consequence, and oblige
Yours
    J. E. Ross
Per C. S. Drew


Col. Ross--I sent word yesterday morning to Belknap for those hospital stores & I hear nothing of them yet. Why the delay?
Grave Creek 3 o'clock
    Oct. 23rd
        A. G. Henry


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 24th 1855
Capt. M. F. Alcorn
    Comdg. Co. "G" Mtd. Vols
        Sir
            You will dispatch ten men of your company, well mounted and equipped, to this place early tomorrow morning.
Very respectfully &c.
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew, Adjt.


[first pages lost]
they generally have the flux. I think that a company of men could not well render the service pointed out but believe they can range in the adjoining gulches and mountains and capture scouting parties of Indians and inform other companies when bands of Indians are in the Applegate country. I have detailed from my own company 16 men which may be raised to 18 if I can but this force is insufficient by at least 30. I wish you would request the U.S. Quarter Master, J. F. Miller, to furnish such supplies to 2 Sergeant E. K. Elliott as he conveniently can by authority from headquarters. He can obtain as much beef as he may need here from Barkwell and others, also forage. I have purchased hay & oats of Strickland enough to answer a short time. If you authorize E. K. Elliott as my 2 Sergeant to take the command of 30 additional men, it would be all right. I shall be in the mountains down R. River and shall keep after the Indians until I find them. I want some scalps. I shall try to be prudent.
Very respectfully yours,
    R. L. Williams, Capt.
        O.T.M.
   
[transmittal on back of letter]
Col. John E. Ross
Jacksonville
Head Quarters
O.T. M.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt., Oregon Militia
        Camp Stuart Oct. 25th, 1855
Doct. A. G. Henry
    Sir
        Reposing full confidence in your skill and ability,  I am desirous of securing your services to take charge in part of the volunteer force now in the field under my command until I am furnished with the necessary surgical aid by the Medical Department of the United States Army. I will allow for your services three hundred dollars per month in lieu of all allowances for pay and perquisites.
    Should you consent to my proposition I will, at some convenient time, enter into such agreement as is required by the regulations of the regular service and give such certificates as may be required by the general government to secure your remuneration.
Very respectfully yours,
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew, Adjt.


    I hereby certify on honor, that Dr. A. G. Henry has performed the duty of Surgeon in accordance with the within agreement from the twenty-fifth of October to the 22nd day of November, inclusive.
Head Quarters of
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Nov. 22nd 1855


Jacksonville, Oct. 25, 1855
Sir
    I have this moment received my commission as Assistant Quartermaster and Commissary of Subsistence in the Ninth Regiment, Oregon Militia; which I accept, and will report myself at Headquarters tomorrow.
Very respectfully yours,
    B. J. Burns
John E. Ross
    Col. Comdg. 9th Regt., O.M.


Cow Creek
    Oct. 25th  55/
Col. Ross
    I arrived here yesterday with a small detachment, in company with Capt. Rinearson. There was on the 23 & 24 five ranches plundered, houses burnt and a vast amount of stock killed. There are several families poorly fortified. Their situation is critical. I am informed by many who reside here that the Indians are well prepared for fight and intend to fight us in this region.
    There was 4 men killed, 2 wounded and some missing.
Yours resp.
    E. B. Stone
        1st Lieut. Co. D 9th Regt.
   
I fully agree with Lieut. Stone as to the above report.
J. S. Rinearson, Capt. of Co. C, 9th Reg. O.M.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt., Oregon Militia
        Camp Stuart Oct. 25th 1855
Capt. J. S. Rinearson
    Comdg. Co. "C" 9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            Major Westfeldt has today dispatched a pack train in charge of packmaster O'Neil with a small quantity of supplies to your post, under an escort of ten men detailed from Co. "G."
    Major Westfeldt has today dispatched a pack train in charge of Mr. O'Neil and under an escort of ten men detailed from Co. "G" with supplies for your station with supplies. The train is under orders for Galice Creek to bring convey to your post the wounded of Capt. Lewis' Co. and also to remove the supplies in charge of Messrs. Crandall and Wilson to the same point, to be turned over to Asst. Q.M. B. J. Burns.
    You will in the event that Capt. Williams furnish an additional escort the services of twenty men from your command provided Capt. Williams has cannot furnish that number or if in case that Capt. W. can furnish can detail a less number, you will supply the deficiency. A detachment of dragoons also will also leave Fort Lane today in charge of the at or near the same time in charge the squaw "Mary" who is sent as messenger to the Indians in order if possible to effect the rescue of either the child of Mr. Haines [lines cut off on scan]

which is believed to be still living, and kept as a prisoner by the Indians in the vicinity of Galice Creek the meadows.
    The troops are to proceed to Galice Creek. The messenger, who will then be permitted to take her own course in quest of the captured child from that point.
Very respectfully yours,
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M
   
    The companies of Captains Harris & Bruce, and the command of Capt. Judah of the regular service, have returned, and the Col. Comdg. regrets the necessity of informing you that no traces of any considerable number of Indians could be found in any portion of the large extent of country which they so thoroughly explored.
    The Col. Comdg. is of the opinion that the main body of the enemy is in the vicinity of the Meadows and below Galice on Rogue River.
   

Note: Duplicates of this have been forwarded to Captains Williams and Lewis   
C. S. D., Adjt.


Applegate, Pardee's Ferry
    Oct. 25th / 1855
Col. John E. Ross
    Dear Sir    I write you a few lines to inform you that the Indians has this day been doing mischief on the mountains between here and Mr. Mooney's ranch. I do not know how many men was killed. A man that was in the train and made his escape was my informant. He says he saw 2 men killed and he saw one Indian and heard about 12 guns near at one time at the place he saw a lash rope lying in the road and 1 dead mule and nearby he saw a large puddle of blood nearby and the [Indians] had a large fire made by the roadside. He thinks that a train was seen in the morning coming this way. He met at the foot of the mountain 2 horses that he knew. He looked back and saw the Indians following the mules and killing them. I don't know how it is I am going to see before daylight. I have only 12 men. My camp is scattered in every direction. I sent a detachment to Galice Creek and one to Cow Creek. I suppose the houses in Cow Creek Valley was all destroyed. I don't know how many or if any was killed though I suppose some persons were killed.
    Several men is on Applegate and the people is after me every day to come to some excitement. I have got men at every ranch and they are after me for more. I have left some at Vannoy's Ferry and they [omission] getting beef. We have got a good supply of ammunition. I suppose we will have to come up for flour. I have enlisted more men than my roll calls for by six and I want the power of enlisting for the purpose of getting a good camp of mountain men out of them for the winter and every man is required in the vicinity. If I do not do this I can get no chance to go in the woods. There is seven men coming from Sailor Diggins to join. It is required that every ranch should have several men. From what I can learn, the Indians are in small bands all over the country. 5 or 6 Indians was seen at sunset on the opposite side of the river from Van's Ferry. Just as soon as I can get some flour, I am fixed for a good campaign. Capt. Lewis says down the river is the place. We are trying to get him out with his wounded. I got Mr. J. Strickland to turn in 1 ton hay and one stack of oats. I did not receipt to him for it. I can get several hundred lbs. of barley and oats, hay &c. I want you to write to me as soon as possible. We will let you know more about it after tomorrow. I have got 5 mules more for transportation. I wish you to send an answer as soon as you receive this. If I can get a little time [sic] from the ranches I think we will have some time take though it takes time. It is no small job. Please [reply] by the bearer.
Respectfully yours
    R. L. Williams
        Capt.


Jacksonville Oct. 25th 1855
Col. John E. Ross
    Dear Sir
        I accept your proposition to take charge of a portion of the volunteers under your command as surgeon, and am ready to enter upon duty at any time & place you may designate.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        A. G. Henry, M.D.


Illinois Valley O.T.
    October 26th 1855
    At a meeting of the citizens of this and Deer Creek valley, for the purpose of organizing a volunteer company to protect the inhabitants from the Indians, C. P. Sprague, Esq. was called to the chair and Geo. Sam. Rice appointed Secretary.
    Orin T. Root was on motion unanimously elected as Captain with instructions to proceed as soon as practicable to Jacksonville to obtain a commission as Captain with authority to enlist men for the purposes named in a petition of which he is the bearer.
    On motion the meeting was then adjourned.
C. P. Sprague, Chairman
Geo. Sam. Rice, Secretary


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 27th / 55
Geo. E. Briggs
    Asst. Q.M. & C. S. 9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            The Col. Comdg. has designated your place as being suitable for the location of a Military Depot for the present service, particularly in your section of country.
    It is expected that your duties ordinarily will extend only so far as related to the Companies of Captain Frye and Captain Root, unless other companies should be raised in your vicinity.
    Crescent City will be the point from whence you will procure such supplies as you may be required for the service, with the exception perhaps of the article of Flour, which can probably be obtained on more advantageous terms in this vicinity.
[unsigned copy]


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 27th 1855
Maj. J. H. Russell
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            The Col. Comdg. deems it expedient that some point in your vicinity should district be designated as a place for the storage of supplies for the present service. Such a course procedure would lessen the extraordinary expenditure incident to the transportation of supplies in small quantities, and oftentimes under disadvantageous circumstances injurious to the service. Should this suggestion meet your approbation, you will select such location and make such arrangements as you may deem proper in the premises.
John E. Ross
    Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
        Per C. S. Drew, Adjt.


Evans Ferry
    Oct. 28th 1855
Dear Agt.
    I met an express this morning from Major Fitzgerald. He inform me that the Indians was in a large body near Grave Creek and thought they was agoing to make a bold stand, as they had a large amount of stock with them. At Birdseye's I sent a messenger across for Harris' company and while there Brown and CM [company?] came up and confirmed the same thing (at this place I met Miller & Hillman. Bruce & com. went to Vannoy's. The company at Galice Creek will be out tomorrow and I will proceed tomorrow for Grave Creek or as soon as possible with all the force I can get. I do not think that the attack will be made before Wednesday morning as the men is very much scattered. Williams' company is at Vannoy's in part. I want to make a good thing if possible. If Capt. George is there I would like to have him with me, and if he is then I want that train loaded with flour & goods and sent on down as soon as you can. Please forward the Qr. requisition.
Yours respectfully
    J. E. Ross
        Col. 9 Regt. O.M.


Applegate Oct. 28th 1855
Col. John E. Ross
    Dear Sir
        In answer to the verbal message I received from you last night, I can only say that the condition of my horses will not admit of our leaving this place at so short a notice, and I think it very essential that my company should remain here as there are no other volunteers here, and the citizens think that Old John is up on the head of Deer Creek, where I will go as soon as possible.
    The rumor in regard to Alex. Miller's fate is all false. He is on his way this morning to Jacksonville, there has been only two men killed on the Mooney Mountain and they were both Mexicans.
Yours most obt.
    T. S. Harris


Althouse Oct. 29 / 1855
    We the undersigned citizens of Althouse and the adjacent country, having been much aggrieved by the hostilities of small parties of Indians lurking through the woods and waylaying persons that have been by necessity compelled to pass from one place of abode to another & also having burnt buildings and destroyed much property on Sucker Creek which is a distance of three miles from this place, do consider ourselves in imminent danger, being entirely without the means of defense. Therefore, we would solicit and pray that your honor would empower Theron Crook to raise a company for the purpose of ranging the mountains and country round about & further to protect such parties as are compelled to travel through the vicinity and further your petitioners prayeth not.
    Hiram Rice Simonafeld Cohen
J. J. Rote D. D. Drake
Frederick Rhoda John R. Hale
Lucius D. Hart E. R. Crane
S. Matthews Alden Whitney
Charles F. Wilson Joshua Harlan
Elias Winkelbleck S. H. Harper
S. P. Duggan M. P. Howard
John Morrow R. S. A. Calwell [Colwell, Caldwell]
Allen Knapp Geo. Lake
W. H. B. Douglas Thomas Lake
Wm. Lane Geo. Koblence
J. T. Mann Jacob Roudebush
Geo. H. Grayson Peter Colean
R. T. Brickley Gilharts
J. H. Huston N. S. Barr
L. Coffey William Lance
H. Kasten Robert Rose
John Murphy N. D. Palmer
B. B. Brockway James Hole
A. L. Scott E. D. Cohen
Geo. W. Comegys Sigmund Heilner
Henry [illegible] Wm. Chapman
James C. Castleman John D. Post
Sigmund Heilner John W. Meredith
A. More [Moore]
Thos. Ford


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 26th 1855
Capt. A. S. Welton
    Comdg. Co. "F" 9th Regt., O.M.
        Sir
            As it is desirable that the road from Crescent City to this valley should be kept open to the public, the Col. Comdg. therefore desires you to proceed with your command to Dr. Barkwell's place on Applegate where you will rendezvous and render such service as you may deem expedient. There are several citizens in that section of country who are desirous of enlisting in the service. You will enroll as many as may be necessary to fill up your company. You will draw upon the Q.M. & C.S. for supplies. Beef can probably be procured on Applegate.
Very respectfully yours
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew, Adjt.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 26th 1855
Lieut. John Osborne
    Sergeant Day
        Co. "G" 9th Regt. O.M.
            Sir
                You will proceed with the detachment under your command to escort the pack train dispatched today by Maj. Westfeldt in charge of Mr. O'Neil to Galice Creek and back to Head Quarters.
    On your way to Galice Creek, you will report to Captain Rinearson or to Captain Williams either of whom will furnish for an additional escort from "Vannoy's Ferry" or "Picket's Ranch." Capt. Rinearson is probably at the latter place.
John E. Ross
    Col. Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew Adjt.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 27th 1855
Lieut. John Osborne
    Co. "G" Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            The Col. Comdg. desires that you should proceed with the supplies in charge of Mr. O'Neil, to Vannoy's Ferry. And should you there receive an additional escort from Captains Williams or Rinearson, sufficient for the service, you will proceed to Galice Creek as directed in your instructions of yesterday.
    Vannoy's Ferry is decided upon as being the best point for a station. "Picket's Ranch" will therefore be abandoned. Should it be impossible for an additional escort to join you at Vannoy's, you will wait until Capt. Bruce arrives. Capt. Bruce will leave here tomorrow morning. Report of the depredations on Cow Creek have been received up to yesterday evening. The cause of the delay of Capt. Bruce's command is the loss of animals. Arrangements are being made to obviate this difficulty in future.
    Should you deem it inexpedient to move from Birdseye's until a reinforcement comes up, you will remain until additional force arrives.
Very respectfully yours
    John E. Ross
        Col. Comd. 9th Regt. O.M.
Per C. S. Drew Adjt.


[first page not scanned]
    Fifteen companies of volunteers are in the field and a still larger force is required. A vigorous effort will be made to keep the command in the field service until after snow falls. Treaties effected with powder and ball, and no other, is the motto. The Indian difficulties north are assuming a serious aspect and. The undue efforts put forth by the party hucksters and political jugglers of the party in power in Oregon to place the Indians above citizens, no point of virtue, morality and integrity have proved unavailing. The political cards are dealt and the hands of our the enemies of Southern Oregon, the friends of the "poor Indian" savage have been exposed. The Governor in selecting mustering officers for the service in northern Oregon chose seven out of eight from among his own satellites. In this arrangement he has been exceedingly unfortunate, for not one of his appointees have been elected to the commission of a company so far as yet heard from. The trick was too barefaced, and the Governor has received at the hands of the people of Oregon the rebuke which he so justly merited.
    Since the second day of last June, the hireling presses of Durhamism have been teeming with abuse of the citizens of Southern Oregon for the policy pursued by them relate heretofore relative to Indian depredations. They have resorted to personal abuse and resorted every other means to create the impression upon with the general government that the whites are in almost
every instance the aggressors.
    The parties who have been first and foremost in this matter, and whose doings have been endorsed by the leaders of Oregon Democracy, are Judge Deady, J. W. Drew, J. F. Miller, and Clerk Schoolmaster S. H. Taylor, Doct. Ambrose, W. G. T'Vault, A. Bush, Joel Palmer, J. L. Parrish & F. M. Smith. The eight former are all anonymous correspondents of the Statesman and the latter balance are Indian agents.
[unsigned]


Phoenix Mills Octo. 29th, 1855
Col. John E. Ross
    Sir  The citizens of this vicinity are desirous of forming a company for military protection subject to your orders whenever you may deem their services necessary in the present campaign. The isolated and defenseless condition of a large portion of the families in this part of the valley would make them an easy prey to any considerable body of Indians, especially if attacked in the night. Whatever recommendation or order you may think proper for their security, we think would be promptly obeyed. We would also inform you that there is a great lack of arms. If you could furnish us with 6 or 8 guns they would be very acceptable. If you see proper to grant this our most sincere request, please furnish us a blank muster roll together with all necessary authority to raise a company.
Yours truly,
    S. M. Wait
    S. Colver
    Joseph Tracy
    Jairus F. Kennedy
    M. M. Williams
    J. F. Gray
 

Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart October 29th 1855
Messrs S. M. Wait, S. Colver
And others
    Yours of yesterday is received and contents noted.
    In the absence of the Col. Comdg. the duty devolves upon me to remain at head-quarters, and attend in order to facilitate correspondence, and attend to such details as the necessity of the service may require.
    It is obvious that the citizens in your vicinity are in a precarious situation as you represent, and that the public welfare would be promoted by the enlistment of a company of volunteers to be stationed in your neighborhood both for the protection of citizens alike of both life and property.
    I am aware that it is the opinion of the Col. Cmdg. is of the opinion that too many men cannot be mustered for the present service. Therefore, I forward to you a blank muster roll for anyone whom you may select to [form] a company of mounted men who will select elect their officers in the usual due form. Should an insufficient  it be impossible to procure a sufficient number of men to form a company, such number as can be procured may be attached to some company already organized and detailed for the service which you require. In the event, however, that a full company can be raised (which is very certainly desirable) by enrolling a portion of the same without horses, such number of men is The enrollment of a full company, however, is particularly desirable, and in the enlistment of which if it becomes necessary to enroll unmounted men, it is deemed advisable to do so. The latter can be stationed as a permanent force in your neighborhood while those that are mounted the former can hold themselves in readiness for service in other quarters. The place of rendezvous is left optional with yourselves. Waits Mill is however, is regarded as the proper point best location as it is a central point position and it is important that Requisitions for supplies will be drawn upon the Q.M. at this place. No arms can be furnished at present as there are none in hand. Every effort will be made to procure arms and if successful, you shall have your pro rata.
    I herewith transmit your muster roll
C. S. Drew
    Adjt. 9 Regt. O.M.


[illegible] at Meeting held this day, the Octbr. 30 1855 by the Miners of Althouse and Vicinity for the Purpose of forming a Company of Volunteers for mutual Protection against the Attacks of the Indians who are infesting the Neighborhood, Mr. T. A. Thomas been selected for Chairman, E. D. Cohen, Secretary, [illegible] as Clerk, the following Gentlemen has been appointed for Officers to command the Company
M. P. Howard, Captain
Daniel Richardson, First Lieutenant
John R. Hale, Second Third Lieutenant
H. B. Conroy, Third Second Lieutenant
W. M. Evans, Orderly Sergeant


Sterling Oct. 30th '55
    Sir--Capt. Gardner informs me that he had me appointed as Commissary or Assistant Quartermaster for the co. raised at this place.
    My business is such thatI cannot accept the appointment but would most [omission] recommend Mr. A. B. Meacham, a member of the co, as every way competent to discharge the duties required of that office.
Yours respectfully
    L. S. C. Duncan


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Oct. 30th 1855
A. B. Meacham, Esq.
    Sir
        Relying upon your integrity and ability, I have appointed you Assistant Q.M. & C.S. in the 9th Regt. O.M. and have assigned you the Sterling District. Your duties generally will be confined to the company
C. S. Drew, Adjt.


Sterlingville Oct. 30th 1855
C. S. Drew, Q.M.G. O.M.
    Sir    I spoke to Mr. Duncan in relation to the appointment of Quartermaster for this co. He says that his business is such that he will have to decline but would most respectfully recommend Mr. A. B. Meacham as being a man who is fully competent to discharge the duties of the office. I would also recommend Mr. A. B. Meacham as being well qualified for the office. I will send by the bearer a requisition for provision for my company for about seven or eight days. You will please write me a note informing me who will act as Quarter Master and also how long my company will remain in the United States service.
I remain yours
    Respectfully
        T. J. Gardner, Capt.
   
I would like to know who will appraise the animals that will be in our service.



Head Quarters
    9th Rgmt O.M.
        Capt Stuart Oct. 30th 1855
Col. John E. Ross
    Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
        Dear Sir
            Maj. Westfeldt has dispatched Dobson's train to Vannoy's, with supplies.
    Capt. Fowler has arrived from Crescent City and has been extremely fortunate in raising supplies. "7000 lbs." are on the way and "14000 lbs." more are subject to order. I have mustered two additional companies of volunteers; a portion of each will serve as infantry and be stationed at Wait's Mill and Sterling.
    The mounted portion of these companies will be ready to move by Friday morning. Capt. George has arrived with recruits. His company now numbers about forty. He will not be ready to move before tomorrow evening. The Indians are becoming venturesome in all parts of the valley. On Saturday last, they robbed Maj. Ball's house on Butte Creek and shot an ox. Yesterday an Indian spy was discovered near the "Mountain House." A few days since, Esquire Steele captured an Indian spy in Scott Valley--the Indian is now in bond at "Fort Jones."
    I am of the opinion that an attack will be made upon the settlers of the valley before long, hence the necessity of protecting Wait's Mill as the source of supplies.
Very respectfully your obt. servt
    C. S. Drew


Fort Leland O.T. Oct. 30th 1856 [sic]
    9th Regt. Oregon Militia
To
    Doct. W. H. Paxton
Dr.
    To medicine and attendance from the 30th day of Oct. 1855 to the 22nd day of Novr. 1855 at the rate of twenty-five dollars per day both days inclusive
amounting to $600.00/100
   

    I do certify that the above services were rendered by my special request and the above account is just and true.
Jacksonville O.T. January 1st 1856
    T. S. Harris
        Capt. Commanding
            Co. A 9th Regt. O.M.


H.Q. Evans Creek
    Oct. 30th 1855
Orders
    Captains Bruce, Harry, Rinearson, Williams & Welton will hold themselves in readiness to march to the vicinity of the encampment of the Indians at 11 o'clock this night.
    They will each leave a sufficient number of men to take charge of their horses.
    They will provide themselves with two days' rations.
J. E. Ross
    Col. 9 Regt. O.M.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. Oregon Militia
        Camp Stuart Oct. 30th 1855
A. B. Meacham, Esq.
    Sir
        Relying upon your integrity and ability, I have appointed you Assistant Quartermaster and Commissary of Subsistence, and have assigned you the Sterling Station.
    Appointment made in the absence of the Col. Commanding.
Respectfully yours,
    C. S. Drew
        Adjt. 9th Regt. O.M.


"Brigg's Ranch"
    Illinois Valley
        October 31st 1855
Col. John E. Ross
    Comdg. 9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            Your favor of date 27th inst. is at hand, appointing me Asst. Quartermaster and Commissary of Subsistence in the 9th Regt. Oregon Militia, and assigning me the Illinois Valley District.
    Feeling under great obligations for your most flattering notice, I accept the appointment.
    I have already furnished Capt. Frye's company with what subsistence they have required, and I shall also furnish Capt. Root's Company "N" who are now enlisting at my house, with all in my power, until I can receive supplies from some other quarter.
    Being entirely unacquainted with the duties of my office, I trust I shall receive from you full instructions at your earliest convenience.
    Almost any number of pack animals can be employed here, at reason-
[second page lost or not scanned]


Report of Killed & Wounded & Missing
in Battle with the Indians in Grave Creek Hills
on the 31st of October & the 1st of November 1855
   
Capt. Rinearson's Company
    Henry Pearl Killed
Jacob W. Miller do.
James Pearcy Missing & believed to be killed
Enoch Miller Wounded severely
W. H. Crouch do.
Ephraim Yager do. slightly
   
Capt. Gordon's Company
    Hawkins Shelton Wounded slightly
James. M. Fordice do. severely
William Wilson do.
   
Capt. Bailey's Company
    John Gillespie Killed
John Walden Wounded severely
John C. Richardson do.
James Laphar do.
Thomas J. Aubrey do.
John Pankey do. slightly
   
Capt. Harris' Company
    Jonathan Petigrew Wounded mortally
Ira Mayfield do. severely
L. F. Allen do.
William Purnell do.
Wm. Hans [Harris] do.
John Goldsby do. slightly
Thomas Gill do.
   
Capt. Bruce's Company
    Charles Goodwin Wounded mortally
   
Capt. Welton's Company
    John Kennady Wounded mortally
   
Capt. Williams' Company
    John Winters Killed
John Stanus Wounded severely
Thomas Rynn do. slightly
   
Recapitulation
    Killed 4
Wounded mortally 2
Missing & believed to be dead 1
Wounded severely 12
Wounded slightly   7
    Total killed, wounded & missing 26
   
Note--Capt. Smith of the regular troops had 3 killed in action & 1 on the field by accidentally shooting him and 7 wounded (none mortally) including Lieutenant Gibson.
    The wounded were all brought in from the battlefield last evening, and made as comfortable as possible under the circumstances--and are now all doing well, especially those taken to the "Six Bit" Hospital where quarters were prepared for them in accordance with your order. It is much to be regretted that owing to a misapprehension of your order or some other cause the wounded of Captains Harris, Welton & Bruce were taken to Grave Creek House where no provision had been made for their recuperation.
    We have here three rooms with fires, and when the supplies furnished on your order, and which are expected tomorrow, are received, we shall be able to afford the sick & wounded every comfort that can be reasonably desired.
Respectfully submitted
    A. G. Henry
        Surgeon of Volunteers
            Six Bit Hospital
                Nov. 2nd 1855
To Col. John E. Ross
    9th Reg. Oregon Militia


Fort Vannoy
    Nov. 3rd 1855
Quarter Master and Commissary Department of
    9th Regt. Oregon Militia
        Mr. Chas. Drew, Adjt. 9th Regt. O.M.
            Sir
                Please send me a list of companies composing the 9th Regt. Oregon Militia and stationery for the use of the Department also an enrollment to enlist a company of infantry at this post. Said enrollment was ordered by Col. Ross at the time of my appointment.
Your obt. servt
    R. S. Belknap
        Asst. Qtr. Master & Com
            Of 9th Regt. Oregon Militia


Douglas Co. O.T. Nov. 4th 1855
Col.
    J. E. Ross
        Dear Sir    I regret to inform you I can't do anything for the relief of the suffering in the South as yet. I have been busy ever since I arrived at home & did think it would be no trouble to get a company to volunteer to relieve the suffering people in the South, but I find it to be a task. I was just on the eve of getting a company to make a start when the word was out that it was not legal, and the Governor's proclamation did not call for but one company from Douglas Co. and one from Umpqua Co. I laid aside the commission you gave me when I read the proclamation and tried to organize a company under the proclamation, but I now drop it for the present as the people wish to wait for an order from the Governor calling for another company from Douglas Co. I hope you will relieve me for the present, but if you can use me to any advantage, I am at your service always. I expect to come out if there is another company called for from this county. I have much to write if I was a mind to tell you how bad the Indians scared [me] on Cow Creek but I will not bore you with nonsense for a miss is as good as a mile as Jackson said when he landed above the rapids. So it was with me. I see so much humbug in papers I am ashamed to tell of the elephant I saw.
    We are well at present and hope when this comes to hand we may be enjoying all the blessings of life.
    Please accept my best wishes and prosperity for yourself and family.
Yours truly
    F. R. Hill
To Col. John E. Ross


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Nov. 6th 1855
Geo. E. Briggs
    Asst Q.M. & C.S. 9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            Yours of Oct. 31st is received as is also that of Oct. 23rd.
    Of the necessity of being constantly on guard against the incursions of Indians in your section of country, the Col. Comdg. entertains similar opinions to similar to your own opinions consistent precisely in accordance with your own. From It is obvious that the enemy Indians are swarming over every portion of Southern Oregon, generally in small bands of from six to twenty, sometimes more. Too much interest cannot be manifested in this emergency--too many men cannot be enlisted to protect the interests of this section of country.
    With regard to supplying the companies in your vicinity with arms, it is hardly probable that the officer in command of Fort Lane will furnish sufficient to furnish one-tenth part of the command demand.
    The only alternative to be resorted to which suggests itself to the mind of the Col. Comdg. is that the citizens generally should send a messenger to San Francisco (if arms cannot be bought nearer) and purchase them on private account. It is worse than useless for citizens to rely upon the agents of the government for aid in matters relative to Indian matters. No arms of any kind are on hand at the present time nor will the Commandant at Fort Lane promise any specific number and it is doubtful whether any can be procured from that quarter.
    Supplies will be forwarded to you as soon as they can be procured. Maj. Fowler will leave supplies with you on his return from Crescent City.
    The rations allowed by law are 18 oz. of bread or flour, 1¼ lbs. fresh beef, ¾ lb. dried beef, bacon or salted pork, and at the rate of eight quarts of beans or ten pounds of rice, six pounds of coffee, twelve pounds of sugar, four qts. vinegar, one pound of sperm candles, four pounds of soap and two qts. salt to every one hundred rations.
[unsigned copy]


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Nov. 5th 1855
Capt. Gardner
    Sir
        You will detail ten mounted men of your company to operate as a safe guard at Mr. Thompson's on Applegate until further orders. Rations will be immediately forwarded to that point for their subsistence.
By order
    Col. John E. Ross
Per C. S. Drew
    Adjt. 9th Regt. O.M.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Nov. 6th 1855
Capt. Morrison
    Sir
        You will proceed with the detachment of men under your command to escort the trains in charge of Maj. W.W. Fowler to Illinois Valley. You will proceed as far through the in through Illinois Valley to the point where the government train is laying by. You will then escort the govt. train to Fort Lane. Capt. Frye will also dispatch five men on this service.
[unsigned copy]


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Nov. 6th 1855
Capt. W. A. Wilkinson
    Comdg. Co. "H" 9th Regt. O.M.
        Sir
            You will dispatch five mounted men of your command to Mr. Thompson's on Applegate Creek, there to remain as a safe guard until further orders.
[unsigned copy]


Jacksonville Novr. 7th 1855
Col. John E. Ross
    Sir
        I arrived in town last evening. It being rainy today I think it not advisable for me to come down to "Headquarters."
    I wish that the wounded that are at Dr. Miller's could be removed to the hospital in this place. They are doing very poorly for the want of proper care. If any arrangement could be made to remove them immediately it would oblige me very much.
    I wish you would send me another muster roll by the bearer of this note.
Yours with respect
    W. B. Lewis, Capt. Co. "E"


Head Quarters
    9th Regt., O.M.
        Camp Stuart Nov. 6th 1855
Capt. M. M. Williams
    Sir
        You will immediately dispatch ten men (mounted) of your command to this station. It is not necessary that they should be armed, except with revolvers if they have them.
[unsigned copy]


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Nov. 7th 1855
The several companies composing the 9th Regt. O.M. will assemble at Vannoy's Ferry on Friday next (Nov. 9th) for the purpose of mustering into service agreeable to the Proclamation of the Governor of Oregon, i.e. to form a battalion and elect a major to command.
    It is required that a return of muster rolls, account for supplies appraisement lists, &c. pertaining to the present service (that of the Militia of this Regimental District) be made as soon as practicable and forwarded to the station in order that the affairs of such service may be closed up.
By order
    Col. John E. Ross
Per C. S. Drew Adjt. 9th Regt. O.M.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Nov. 8th 1855
Major Martin
    Comdg. Northern Battalion of
        The Southern Division
            Sir
                Your very polite note of Nov. 6th 1855 is at hand and its contents duly noted and fully appreciated.
    You are no doubt aware that no appointments have been made by me for the battalion which you command, and why, this Pronunciamento of yours is more than I can comprehend.
    So far as consulting you or being related to the officers So far as relates to your willingness to consult or be consulted by officers of this regiment, you can remain easy perfectly quiet--I presume no one wishes to consult with you, except perhaps on matters immediately connected with the service.
By order
    Col. John E. Ross
Per C. S. Drew, Adjt. 9th Regt. O.M.


Forest Dale Nov. 4th 1855
Friend Dryer
    The news of the battle which has just taken place with the Indians between Grave and Cow creeks has not doubt been sent to you by Dr. Henry and others, consequently it would be superfluous for me to write anything on that subject. My duties as Adjutant occupies the most of my time but I deem it a matter of importance that you should be made acquainted with the proceedings of the former allies of the Indians. John F. Miller, S. H. Taylor, W. G. T'Vault, Dr. Ambrose and several lesser lights of Durhamism are straining every nerve to extricate themselves from the position they have heretofore taken relative to Indian affairs in this Territory. These worthies are striving to mingle politics with every movement made here of a military character, and are aided by M. P. Deady, Jo Drew and the entire Durham organization of the Willamette.
    Deady is the author of the late "Anti-Humbug" letter to the Statesman and Jo Drew or Dr. Ambrose that of "Miner." Deady and Bush were also the authors of the Bill Martin correspondence to the same paper. Every effort which midnight caucuses can devise is being brought into requisition to oust Col. Ross from the command of the forces here, and for no other cause than the political opinions which he entertains.
    They will expose their hands in a few days, when I expect to see a general stampede of men from the ranks. The state of things is to be regretted, but cannot be avoided unless these military-politicians should change their course.
    Fifteen companies are in the field; consequently it is impossible to carry out the instructions of Governor Curry, who has been guided by unwholesome counsel in all matters pertaining to the service here and who knows nothing of the real situation of the citizens of Jackson County, or of the number of men required for the present service.
    It is due to Col. Ross to say that in all his proceedings he has had no other object in view [than] that of promoting the general good.
Yours in haste
    C. S. Drew
   
Please send the Oregonian to Col. Ross and to Thomas Chase--send as many back numbers as you can with the "Clarendon letters" in them.
    Your subscription list here will increase rapidly as soon as things get a little settled.
C. S. Drew
   
Note: This letter as a matter of course is private
C.S.D.


Headquarters 9th Regt. O.M.
    Camp Stuart
        November 21st 9th 1855
Know all men by these presents: That J. B. Wagoner served as Express Rider in the 9th Regt., Oregon Militia from the 13th day of October 1855 to the 21st 9th day of Nov. 1855 inclusive, making (28) twenty-eight days at the specified price of eight dollars per day, and is hereby honorably discharged.
By order of Col. John E. Ross
Per C. S. Drew
Adjt. 9th Regt. O.M.


Head Quarters
    9th Regt. O.M.
        Camp Stuart Nov. 11th 1855
His Excellency
    Geo. L. Curry
        Governor of Oregon Territory
            Sir
                I beg leave to call your attention to the deplorable condition of Indian  affairs in this Regimental District, so far as related to the deplorable situation of the citizens of this Regimental District and the country adjacent thereto, with regard to/relative to the several Indian tribes who are infesting this neighborhood.
    I beg leave again to call your attention to the dangerous situation of the citizens of this Regimental District section of Oregon, rendered so by the existence of Indian hostilities of which you have been advised in a former communication. The disbanding of the several companies under my command, which I had called into service at the commencement of open hostilities, in order to carry and who were actively engaged have continued to remain in active service up to the time of their discharge, has operated injuriously to the public welfare and has left the citizens here destitute of the means of defense or protection. The battalion authorized to be raised by your proclamation of October 15th is wholly inadequate insufficient even if filled to its maximum strength to render the service required, as you will see by no doubt learn by the reports of the officers connected therewith. At least two thousand men are required to render for the present service in this Regimental District alone. I therefore ask that my acts connected with the present service may be approved and that the services of the 9th Regt. may again be called into requisition.
Very respectfully yours
    [unsigned draft[


Head Quarters
    9th Regt., O.M.
        Camp Stuart, Nov. 11th 1855
His Excellency
    Geo. L. Curry
        Governor of Oregon Territory
            Sir
                Duty again compels me to call your attention to the dangerous situation of the citizens of Southern Oregon, by reason of the existence of Indian hostilities of which you have been advised; and invoke your aid in defending the inalienable rights of the people of this Regimental District.
    The disbanding of the several companies of volunteers who have been in active [service] since the commencement of open hostilities, up to the time of their discharge, has operated injuriously to the public welfare, having left the citizens here comparatively destitute of the means of defense.
    The battalion authorized by Proclamation of October 15th is wholly insufficient, even if filled to its maximum strength, to render the service required in the present emergency as you will doubtless learn by the reports of the officers connected therewith. At least fifteen hundred men are required for the service in this district alone. I therefore ask that my acts connected with the present service may be approved and that the services of the 9th Regiment, Oregon Militia, may be immediately called into requisition. A full report of the operations of the forces recently under my command will be forwarded to you at an early day.
Very respectfully, your obt. servt.
    By order
        Col. John E. Ross
Per C. S. Drew, Adjt. 9th Regt. O.M.

Bancroft Library Mss. P-A 137



Last revised September 25, 2017